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OUR TOWN 



VOLUME 23, No. 4 



Reciprocity Luncheon 
Tuesday at Narberth 

Women's Community Club to 

Present Two Artists 

at Event 



PRESIDENTS ARE GUESTS 



One of the largest events on the 
club calendar of Montgomery County 
this year will be the Reciprocity 
Luncheon to be Riven by the Women's 
Community Club of Narberth Tues- 
day, Election Day, at 12.30 o'clock, 
in the club rooms in the Community 
Building, Narberth, when the visiting 
presidents of the various clubs in the 
county and vicinity will be the guests. 
All reservations for the luncheon 
must be in by this Sunday evening 
and may be made with Mts. J. K. 
Burrell at Merion 140-1. Mrs. Joseph 
II. llongler, chairman of the hospi- 
tality committee, is in charge. 

The program committee will pre- 
sent two outstanding artists, Florence 
Iluet, who will give an impersonation 
of Peggy Shippen, the famous Phila- 
delphia Belle of the Revolution; and 
Dorothy Johnstone Baseler, the well- 
known harpist. Mrs. Baseler will be 
accompanied by Mrs. Richard Reck- 
nagle, of Narberth. 

Miss Huet will present three scenes 
of her original historic drama, the 
Meschinaza Ball in 1778 at the old 
Wharton Mansion when Peggy was 
18; the second at West Point when 
Peggy had become Mrs. Benedict Ar- 
nold, 1780, when Major Andre was 
caught as a spy and the third and 
final scene, at the Cenotaph of Major 
Andre in Westminster Abbey in Lon- 
don, 1797. Miss Huet will wear cos- 
tumes of the Colonial period. 

Mrs. Ralph C. Heath, the president, ' 
has opened her home to all of the ' Narberth's third 
out-of-town guests on that day, when Gras is this eveninj 
trains will be met at the station for 
the visiting members of other clubs. , th am] E?sex nVenucs . 




NARBERTH, PENNSYLV ANIA, OCTOBER 30, 1936 

[Classmates to Honor 
R. M. Patten's Memory 

Naval Officers to Unveil Tablet 
to Late Lieutenant 
• Sunday 



PRICE, FIVE CENTS 



!AT TOMS RIVER SCHOOL 



! This Sunday at 3.30 P. M., the 
; United States Naval Academy class 
'of 1930 will unveil and dedicate a 
' memorial tablet to the late Lieutenant 
(jg) Robert M. Patten, U. S. N., in 
:Du Pont Hall of the Admiral Farra- 
gut Academy, Toms River, Pine 
j Beach, N. J. 

! Friends and relatives of Lieutenant 

| Patten are cordially invited to attend. 

1 The program will include addresses 

by the superintendent of Admiral 

Farragut Academy, Admiral S. S. 

Robinson, U. S. N., retired, and by a 

representative of the United States 

| Naval Academy class of 1930. Lieu- 

1 tenant Ray W. Johnson, U. S. N. 

The academy colors will be lowered 
to half-mast from 12 noon to the 
! termination of the ceremony. 
j Admiral Farragut Academy is lo- 
cated on the Toms River three miles 
south of the town ,Toms River. From 
[this section it can be reached via 
; Route N. J. -40 in about three hours. 



Miss Florence Hint as Penan Shippev, the Revolutionary Belle of Phila- 
delphia, deeded for the Meschanzia Ball, who will appear in a historical 
drama at the Reciprocity luncheon of the Xarherlh Women's Community 
Club Tuesday afternoon. 



Lieutenant Robert Melville Patten, 
then a 27-year-old navy flier, died Oc- 
tober 30, 1931, when his plane crashed 
Continued on ruire Five 



Prizes for 
Offered in 



iTO THE VOTERS 

j OF NARBERTH 



Republicanism Versus Roosevelt 

Only Issue At Tuesday's Polls 



Next Assemblyman 



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O. P. Leaders Concentrate 
on Getting Out Big 
Vote 



WELCOME DEMOCRAT AID 



Hiirlii-.-irli 

LAMBERT CADWALADER 

Villanora Republican, who is ex 
peeled to score, a landslide victory 
over his Democratic opponent, 
Samuel K. White, of Merion, )iext 
Tuesilai/ for State's Assemhlyiiani 
from the First District. 



General Wayne Rally 
Social - Political Hit 



Best Costumed Paraders 

Boro Mardi Gras Tonight^SA 

° ! 7 P. M. 

annual Mardi j P. M.; big children of all ages will 
le at S.30. Prizes will be awarded 



Will you please come to the polls 

and avoid the last minute rush, 

polls are open from 7 A. M. to 

and anyone living in the dis- 

! trict two months and in the State 

for one vear, or if a former resident 

Msehief NMKhtllK"""""""-™- l-n.eswu, oeawarue,,!^. ^ ^ jt ^ requiYcd that 

,,n Haverford avenue, between Na, ^ ^ ™* wlh be LlT I >™ «**> * *" State six months 



Mickey Gavin Fund 
Total Likely #500 

Two Baseball Organizations 
Head Contributors to In- 
jured Player's Aid 

PRESENTATION NOV. 9TH 



The street 
will be roped ofl" for a playground for 
young folks and younger folks. There 
will be music, a parade, dancing, 
crowds and crowds of merrymakers, 
and attractive prizes for the finest 
and the funniest Hallowe'en costumes. 

The Main Line public is invited to 
the affair, which in its first two years 
attracted hundreds of Goblin-Dance 
watchers. Narberth police and fire- 
men will preserve order. 

Children up to 12 will march at 7 



Two baseball organizations headed 
the list of contributors to the Mickey 
Gavin Fund announced this week by 
R. A. Cabrey, president of the Nar- 
berth Baseball Club, of which the in- J 
jured player was the star shortstop, j 

They are the Manoa Baseball Club, ln . T , w/ , , w 

,., „ i .1 nr ■ t rn. ,;i: t,j. Reviewer Lauds Work ot JNar- 
$16, and the Main Line Twilight 



In case of rain this Friday evening, | 



j and two months in the district, may 



vote, regardless of whether you are 
"l! registered or not. This may be clone 

the Narberth Business Council. 
Committee in charge is headed by 



the Mardi Gras will be held next Mon 
day evening. It is under auspices 



Marios Chios and includes Mrs. Suz- 
anne Joret Gill, Mrs. Eberhart Muel- 
ler, Mrs. Ralph Heath, and Messrs. 
Gene Davis, Gordon Wundcr, Nicho- 
las Finoia, Frank Salasin and Harry 
Hollar, who is treasurer, and who 
welcomes contributions from the pub- 
lic to help pay for the costs. 



on affidavit. For further information 
see any one of the following members 
of the Republican County Committee 
in Narberth: 

Charles V. Noel, 1st District. 

Louise V. Cockrill, 1st District. 

John C. Batchelor, 2nd District. 

Sabina Tyson, 2nd District. 

W. D. R. Evans, 3rd District. 

Margaret U. Griswold, 3rd District. 



Boro American Legion 
Installs New Officers 



Equally successful as a social event 
"and political rally, General Wayne 
District, Ward One, Republicans held 
their first event of this nature last 
Friday evening at the Montgomery 
Day School, Penn Valley. j 

Speakers were Mrs. John Y. Hubcr, Frank J. Dwyer Inducted as 
Jr., Haverford, president of the Lower Commander of Harold D. 

Merion-Narberth Council of Republi- , Sneakman Post 

can Women; Congressman-and-candi- < " * 

As-' 



Play Well Presented 
Under Difficulties 



League, §10. 

The condition of John "Mickey" 
Gavin was reported somewhat better, 
although his right leg, crushed by 
a five and one-half ton girder Octo- 
ber 12, is still giving him much pain. 
Among the donors of several blood 
transfusions for the crippled Bryn 



berth Players With Lim- 
ited Facilities 



APPR \ISAL IS FRANK 



Once more rising above the limita- 
tions of space and equipment which 
so often beset the earnest groups of 



Mawryouthrecently wasMr. Cabrey,j amateui . dramatistSj aild displaying 
who supplied a pint of blood. 



Mr. Cabrey's letter to Our Town 
concerning the fund is appended. 
Editor, Our Town: 



(again the remarkable skill and in- 



|genuity in stage setting that have 

jbeen evidenced in the past, The Nar- 

j berth Players presented to capacity 

While there was no definite goal j audienccs , ast Friday alld Saturday 



set in the "Mickey Gavin Fund," the 



evenings a delightfully entertaining 



present total of §301.25 gives every l comedv> « The Bisho]) Misbehaves," to 
encouragement that a §500 mark willj op( , n ^ nm . um scr j cs f p i avs . 
be reached before November 9, on! Thjg commcnta tor refers first to 
which day the presentation will be thoso i im j tat i ons because it is neces- 



made. 

There is a noticeable absence of 
many familiar names from the list, 
and it is hoped with this reminder 
their contributions will be left at Da- 
vis' store, Narberth, this week. 



sary, in the measurement of any per- 
formance, to give proper weight to 
those factors which no director can 
control, but which occasionally arc 
responsible for an apparent stiffness 
and congestion which in larger quar- 



Main Lines 



Political Pot 



Francis Gane, of Bryn Mawr, went! "Vote— no matter how— in order 
to jail for ten days and must pay j to register your convictions and exer- 
$500 and costs after pleading guilty i c j se your franchise" — said Mrs. Wil- 
at Norristown to booking horse racel Uam H Gehmalln> president of the 
bets. His aide, Henry Dumbell, got| Montgo mery County League of 
off with a §100 fine and costs. It | Womcn Voters, in a pre-election state- 
was in Gane's apartment that Mrs. j mmt thig week Alg0 this sugges tion 
Fan S. Fulmer, Norristown, commit- h made to women voters: Don't wait 
ted suicide with his 32-calibre revol- L ntil f riend husband comes home, to 
ver - J vote Tuesday. Vote early and save 

Russell McBridc, Morion Cricket | dc j ay f or yourself and others. 
Club, Haverford, employe, saw him 



Anti-New Deal talks were made be- 
fore the Republican Service Men's 
League, at Ardmore G. 0. P. head- 
Contlnued on Faire Four 



Fire Company of Ardmore, was over- 
come by fumes in battling a drug 
store blaze at Lancaster and Cricket 
avenues. Other firemen donned gas 
masks. 

Continued on Page Seven 



Everyone who possibly can should iters would not exist. On a stage of 
be on this scroll. 'adequate size, the "line of action" be- 

The following are this week's con- 'tween the actors and the audience can 
tributors: jbe kept open and free from the dis- 

continued nn Page Elcht i trading presence and movements of 

those not engaged in the immediate 
action. Directors of presentations of 
The Narberth Players arc keenly con- 
scious of this problem on the stage 
When the Narberth Co-operative ; of the school auditorium, and on the 
Club meets Monday night at the home! whole have been notably successful in 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Sargent, 124 .surmounting the obstacles that con- 
Chestnut avenue, Dr. William N. I front them in this respect. Stage set- 
Loucks, Associate Professor of Eco-' tings for "The Bishop Misbehaves" 



Economist Will Address 

Narberth Cooperative Club 



self enjoying deep sea fishing the re- 1 

mainder of his life, when he learned 

he had drawn a ticket in the Irish 

Sweepstakes. Half hour later he 

heard his horse had been scratched. 

Still he will receive $2965. 
A fund for Seeing Eye, Inc., which 

furnishes trained dogs to lead blind 

persons, is being raised via a member- 
ship campaign. Local enrollment is 

at Strawbridge & Clothier's Store, 

Ardmore. . . . Lower Morion's relief 

cases last week increased from 35 to 

43 ; Narberth's cases remained at 

four. 

Reports have it that the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad is considering its 

$06,000,000 program, dropped during 

the depression, to electrify its line 

from Paoli to Harrisburg. . . . Henry 

Dolfinger has added nearly two acres, 

bought from Harry C. and Helen j at the General Wayne Inn which 

Koch Evans, to his property on High- opens this Friday after alterations 

I that consumed the entire summer. All 
I the charm and romance of Colonial 



Dictatorship Feared by 
Hubcr; NRA by 
Ditter 



PROVES FESTIVE 



Monday night will end the most 
intensive political campaign in both 
national and local history, featured 
by the greatest amount of rallies, 
speeches, mailed propaganda and 
strictly national partisanship of all 
time. 

On the Main Line as elsewhere, the 
one and only issue has been and is: 
Republicanism versus Roosevelt. 

Each side locally has bent its ef- 
forts toward rolling up a huge vote 
for its national ticket. Montgomery 
County New Deal factions, badly split 
as they are, are united in furthering 
the Roosevelt-Garner cause. 

In his speeches Congressman J. 
William Ditter has been strictly anti- 
administration and pro-Landon. He 
has virtually ignored George H. Bar- 
tholomew, Pottstown Democrat, who 
is after Ditter's job. 

Similarly, Lambert Cadwalader, as- 
semblyman candidate from Villanova, 
has talked only Republican harmony 
and principles; not a word has he 
said against his Democratic opponent, 
Samuel K. White, of Merion . 

Peter C. Hess, Main Line Repub- 
lican leader, summed up this spirit 
recently when he said that "we have 
no quarrel with the Democrats. It 
is the New Dealers we are fighting." 
Mr. Hess also added that "this is the 
most serious campaign I have been 
in, in my 41 years as a voter." 

Every effort is being made to get 
out every vote possible, since it is felt 
MEET by Republican leaders that Montgom- 
ery and other suburban counties must 
CotilSiiutnl on Pace Four 



Mrs 



date J. William Ditter, Ambler 
semblyman-candidate Lambert Cad- 
walader, Villanova, and Township 
Treasurer and Main Line Republican 
Leader, Peter C. Hess, Bala-Cynwyd. 

Entertainment featured George C. 
T. Remington at the electric organ; 
the Lotopep Orchestra, Augmented 
(founded 1916), the Utz Hillbillies 
(from the Mountains of Virginia, 
Narberth and other points south), and 
Olga Alanoff, Philadelphia accordion- 
ist and singer. 

Keynote of the speakers was the 
danger of the bureaucratic and mon- 
ey-wasting Roosevelt administration 
heading into a dictatorship, which 
could be prevented by the election of 
the Landon-Knox G. O. P. ticket. 

Said Mrs. Huber: "The real issue 
of this campaign is to decide whether 
we shall continue to enjoy the bless- 
ings of liberty or whether we shall 
be the slaves of tomorrow." 

Congressman Ditter would like to 
know what President Roosevelt plans 
for the future (providing he is re- 
elected) in the way of NRA revival 
and TVA extension. 

Candidate Cadwalader said he con- 
sidered the job of assemblyman as a 
('nntli. 'jed on rage E'ght 



COMMITTEES ARE LISTED 



Reopening of General Wayne Today 
Recalls Rich History of Hostelry 



Slickest transformation in Main 
Line innkeepers' annals is that effected 



nomics at the University of Pennsyl 
vania, will address members and their 
friends on "Business, Government, 
and the Consumer." 

Dr. Loucks' work with the advisory 
committee of the N. R. A. in adopting 
the various codes of business, puts 
him in a position to reveal the plight 
of the consumer in reference to the 
agencies of government and business. 

The public is invited. 



evoked rounds of applause from the 
audience and were a decided credit 
to Roger Burns and Mrs. Harndcn and 
their assistants, who were responsible 
for scenery and lighting and proper- 
tics. 

With respect to the work of the 

players themselves, this commentator 

holds mixed emotions. There were 

times of almost scintillating brilliance 

Continued on Page Eight 



land avenue, Merion. 

Tom Ottey, former Lower Merion 
and Olympic star runner, won time 
honors (31 minutes, 12 seconds) in 
the six-mile race from Philadelphia 
City Hall to Upper Darby Township 
Hall in connection with the town- 
ship's 150th anniversary. 



Pennsylvania have been recaptured in 
this famous old hostelry, whose walls 
are now spotlessly white, with a dash 
of blue at the shutters. Inside, too, 
it is completely new, with natural 
woodwork predominating, and corn- 
Anthony DiNatale, of the Merion fortable oak chairs and cosy tables, 

a large dining room and many pri- 
vate rooms for banquets, dinners, 
luncheons and card parties. 

President of General Wayne Inn, 
Inc., is I. Newton Smith, who for- 
merly owned the Marlyn Hotel at 40th 
and Walnut, Philadelphia. His stew- 
ard, John A. McMahon, was associ- 
ated with him there, and also was 
popular at the St. James and more 



Receives Musical Award 

At a concert held at the Bryn Mawr 
Conservatory of Music, Sunday after- 
noon, Richard Maryott won the merit 
award, given for outstanding accom- 
plishment in technics and repertoire. 
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. George 
U. Maryott, of Sabine avenue, and 
attends Narberth Public School. 



recently at Washington's Lee House. 

The General Wayne, established in 
1704 near the Merion Friends' Meet- 
ing (1095), was built to endure. The 
stone walls, 20 inches thick, were 
erected by Robert Jones on ground 
originally bought from William Penn 
for twenty shillings by Edward Rees 
or Price (historians differ). 

At one time the inn was known 
as the William Penn, renamed for the 
Founder when he stopped there while 
attending Quarterly Meeting at the 
Merion Meeting next door. It was 
also called the Tunis Ordinary and 
Streeper's Tavern. Abraham Streeper 
was a first lieutenant of the Penn- 
sylvania Continental Line. 

Between the Continental and Brit- 
ish forces about half way, the inn 
saw many stirring events. It is pre- 
sumed to have been General Washing- 
Contlnueo on Pars Four 



New officers of the Harold D. 
Spcakman Post, American Legion, 
Narberth, were installed Monday 
night in the Community Building. 
They are Frank J. Dwyer, command- 
er; Roland K. Hewitt, first vice-com- 
mander; Walter P. Miesen, second 
vice-commander; John A. Mowrer, 
finance officer, and Gordon Wundcr, 
sergeant-at-arms; executive commit- 
tee, Vincent Cunningham, Allen Kirk, 
Chester Jones, Frank S. Challenger 
and Edward Ensinger. 

Commander Dwyer announced as 
his committee chairmen: Legal activi- 
ties, Henry A. Frye; membership, Ar- 
thur L. Cooke; Americanism, Frank 
A. Schrepfer; service and welfare, 
William H. Durbin; junior activities, 
Mr. Frye; athletics, Edward Ensin- 
ger; entertainment, Joseph T. Berta, 
and house, Vincent Cunningham. 

Re-elected unanimously as chaplain 
was the Rev. Robert E. Keighton, pas- 
tor of the Baptist Church of the 
Evangel, Narberth. 

Speaker at the meeting was Cap- 
tain Charles D. Bayliss, U. S. Marine 
Corps, retired, who talked on the re- 
cent Chinese-Japanese war. 

Captain Bayliss, a member of the 
Los Angeles Chapter of the Order of 
the Purple Heart, is visiting his sis- 
ter, Mrs. H. R. Rinehart, 301 South 
Narberth avenue, Narberth. 

He has served 32 years in the Ma- 
rine Corps and commanded the fa- 
mous 55th Company, Fifth Regiment 
of the Marines, during the World 
War. He was engaged in five major 
Continued on ratfe l'our 



Burgess Ready for Any 

Trouble on Hallowe'en 

Mischief Nights 



or 



Extra Lower Merion police have 
been assigned to Narberth this Thurs- 
day, Friday and Saturday evenings 
to prevent any possible Hallowe'en 
depredations, Burgess John R. Hall 
announced yesterday. 

Also Burgess Hall will sit at his 
borough office in Elm Hall, Forest 
avenue, these three nights to handle 
any possible complaints of residents 
or to give whatever other co-operation 
is necessary in preserving the peace 
of the borough. 



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Page Two 



OUR TOWN 



October 30, J 936 



Kitsch Chevrolet Co. Preparing for 
Display and Sales of New Models 



A firm that has become thoroughly 
established in the automobile field of 
Montgomery County is Kirsch Chevro- 
let Company, whose showrooms and 
service station are located at 214 Bala 
avenue, Bala-Cynwyd. 

This progressive and up-to-date 
firm, which is headed by Christian H. 
Kirsch, has been serving the public 
for the past eleven years — since 1925, 
to be exact — and is enjoying a large 
list of customers, secured by their ex- 
cellent business methods and a de- 
termination to offer the motoring pub- 
lic only reliable automobiles and ser- 
vice. You can always obtain from 
the above firm the type of car and 
equipment best suited to your particu- 
lar needs. 

This writer has learned that the 
new Chevrolet for 1937, which will be 
out on November 7, is one of the finest 
performing as well as the most beau- 
tiful car Chevrolet has ever built. It 
is really one of the finest buys in the 
low-priced field. In the salesrooms 
of Kirsch Chevrolet Company will be 
found many models of this car and 
courteous, intelligent salesmen on 
hand to explain all the high points 
of the new Chevrolet. 

This firm also maintains a very re- 
liable service and repair department, 
where motorists are assured of the 
use of only genuine parts, prompt and 
correct workmanship. Incidentally, 
Kirsch Chevrolet Company just re- 
cently have had the entire service de- 
partment overhauled and equipped 
the shop with all the latest devices and 
tools, etc., obtainable. They also 
stocked up with a full line of acces- 
sories that is complete in every detail. 
This move was made further to en- 
hance the splendid service that they 
have always been noted for. 

They also have on hand an assort- 
ment of used cars consisting of vari- 
ous models, from which one can select 
a very dependable car. It has al- 
ways been the policy of Kirsch Chev- 
rolet Company to give only the best 
values in used cars and on the easiest 
terms. There is no charge added for 
parts or labor to the prices submitted 
to the purchasers of used cars. A 
written guarantee goes with each car 
sold. 

Mr. Kirsch has attained success 
through his keen business judgment 
and expert knowledge of every phase 
of the automobile business. There are 
few automobile firms more widely or 
favorably known in this section of the 
Main Line than his. 



Ed Beetcm Breaks Shot 

Record at Mercersburg 



Edward \V. Beetem, 141 N. Nar- 
berth avenue, Narberth, broke a Mer- 
cersburg Academy record of 29 years' 
standing last Saturday, when in the 
annual fall meet his shotput meas- 
ured ;>.'{ feet, 10 inches. He also took 
first place in the discus and hammer 
throw. He was star weight man at 
Lower Merion last year. 

Third in the , - H)0-yanl run was 
James E. Meredith, Jr., son of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. E. Meredith, of Merion. 
His father, "Ted" Meredith, formerly 
was the Olympic middle distance 
record holder. 



WHtf* THl$ 




• This is a "hang-up hand- 
set"— a modern type of 
telephone instrument used 
on wall locations in kit- 
chens, playrooms, garages, 
shops and stores or on the 
side of a desk or table where 
working space is limited. It 
provides handy telephone 
service within easy reach 

—yet it's never in the way. 

• 
Extension telephones save time 
and steps; give extra protection 
and privacy. For complete infor- 
mation call the Business Office 
or ask any telephone employee. 

CRADLE TYPE HANDSET 



FOR BEDSIDE. DESK OH TABLE 



THB BEU TELEPHONE COMPANY 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Fire Held Unnecessary 

Menace to Shade Trees 



J. C. Kenealy, of the Lower Merion 
Shade Tree Commission, issues the 
following information. 

The damage caused by fire is only 
one of the elements which is fast 
working toward the destruction of 
our street trees. Lower Merion Town- 
ship has many beautiful streets and 
highways whose beauty is enhanced 
by their existence. 

Too often, fires are started im- 
mediately under trees for the purpose 
of burning leaves. Usually the people 
starting the fires do not realize the 
damage they are causing, but thought- 
lessness is no excuse for damaging 
one of the township's greatest assets. 

Natures own mulch, leaves, when 



available in quantity are excellent for 
mulching rhododendrons, azaleas, 
evergreens, and deciduous shrubs and 
all native woodland plants. They are 
also useful on perennial borders and 
rock gardens. One objection to them 
is that they blow away so easily. 
They can, however, be worked into 
the soil and thus become available as 
plant food, but the roots of rhododen- 
drons and azaleas should not be dis- 
turbed in working in a leaf mulch. 

The Shade Tree Commission urges 
all residents to co-operate in stamp- 
ing out this practice of burning rub- 
bish in the vicinity of trees. 



Letters 
corned. 



of 150 words or less wel- 



Manayunk 2444 

BURDO BROTHERS 

HAULING CONTRACTORS 



Cinders for Sale 
Mushroom Soil 



Crane Service 
Road Building 



Exhibit by Red Cross 

Residents of Bucks, Chester, Dela- 
ware, Montgomery and Philadelphia 
Counties will be given an opportunity 
to see the Red Cross in action at a 
living exhibition of the work of the 
Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter, 
to be opened on November 9 as a fea- 
ture of the annual Roll Call, at 1111 
Chestnut street, for a period of two 
weeks. 



Corn — Nursery Stock 

Corn pulled direct from stalk for 
you, Insuring freshness and sweet- 
ness. Several acres nursery stock 
to be sacrificed. 

CADE, Monument Road 
1 block north of Phila. Country 
Club, City Line, Bala. CYN. 349 -J 



For 



Venetian Blinds 



Call 



2555 



RICKLIN'S— Narberth 

LINOLEUM LAID 

WINDOW SHADES 

Free Estimates Cheerfully Given 

203 Haverford Ave., Narberth, Pa. 



ADELIZZI BROTHERS 

TAILORS, CLEANERS, DYERS, FURRIERS 

228 Bala Avenue — Cynwyd 928 
102 Forest Avenue — Narb. 2602 

Typewriters — Special Sale 

— On All Our Rebuilt 
STANDARD MACHINES 

Send for List of Reconditioned Machines 
and also of New PORTABLES— All Makes 

Prices Cut for Students 

FULLY GUARANTEED EASY TERMS IF YOU LIKE 

LIBERTY TYPEWRITER CO. 

Established 1903 
132 S. 11th Street, Philadelphia 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



KEEP PENNSYLVANIA 



The Vote of Montgomery May Decide the Election 

(Do ipouL bsdisuusL— 



1. That the American form of government is the 
best in the world? 

2. That the Constitution of the United States has 
proven its worth through 150 years of useful 
service? 

3. That the legislative powers dele- 
gated by the Constitution should 
remain with and be exercised by 
the Congress? 

4. That the powers of the Executive 
should be restricted to those set 
down by the Constitution? 

5. That the powers and functions >, ■* 
delegated to the Supreme Court 
of the United States should be 
safeguarded against encroach- 
ment by the Executive or by the 
Congress? 

6. That Communism has no place in 
the American scheme of Govern- 
ment? 

7. That the Federal budget must be balanced as 
a matter of financial safety as well as common 
honesty? 

8. That the deliberate wrecking of the Civil Serv- 
ice through Farleyism is intolerable and must 
cease? 

9. That continued waste by the Government, like 
continual waste by the individual, will ulti- 
mately end in bankruptcy? 



m 



That profligate spending by the Federal 
Government can only be met through higher 
taxes, which become a burden on all citizens- 
rich and poor alike — in increased living costs 
which already are swinging upward at an 
alarming rate? 

11. That a party platform constitutes 
a solemn obligation between the 
party making it and the public? 

12. That citizens must not be perse- 
cuted because they disapprove 
policies of the party in power? 

13. That centralization of power in 
the Federal Government consti- 

Hm tutes a growing menace to the 

rights of the States and to the 
freedom of the individual? 

14. That the instability of the Roose- 
velt rule, almost constantly appar- 
ent since March 4, 1933, threatens 
the extinction of the whole Ameri- 
can system? 

That the effort of the Roosevelt Administration 
to perpetuate itself through purchase with 
taxpayers' funds and the frank coercion of 
those on relief rolls is an economic folly and 
an outrage on government morals? 



16. That the savings of the public as represented 
in insurance policies and savings bank deposits 
should not be depreciated through the destruc- 
tion of public credit in wild spending for the 
sake of spending? 



If your answer is YES to the questions here set down, it is your duty as a citizen, regardless 
of party affiliation, to go to the polls on Tuesday, November 3, in the most crucial national 
election since I860, and vote the straight Republican ticket. 

MONTGOMERY IS THE BANNER REPUBLICAN COUNTY IN PENNSYLVANIA 
MONTGOMERY IS THE BEST GOVERNED COUNTY IN PENNSYLVANIA 
KEEP THE MONTGOMERY TRADITION — VOTE FOR LANDON AND KNOX 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE 
Polls Open 7 A. M. 

ELECTION TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 

Polls Close 7 P. M. 



w 



BjlllWpgi pijj j l^^ 



October 30, 1936 



OUR TOWN 



Page Three 



THE FIRESIDE 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Betus, of Brook- 
hurst avenue, gave a dinner party 
Sunday evening in honor of Miss 
Margaret Bell and Miss Agnes Mac- 
Doiiald, of Hamilton, Ontario, Can- 
ada. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Betus also gave 
a bon voyage shower last Wednesday 
evening in honor of Mrs. Anne Sim- 
mons, of Hatfield, who is sailing for 
India. There were nineteen guests. 

Miss Helen Lafore, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Arniand Lafore, 
of Penn Valley, has returned from a 
visit to Ashland. Ky., where she at- 
tended the marriage of Miss Helena j 
Salmon and Mr. Frank L. Fisher on 
Saturday. 

Mrs. II. G. Turner, Jr., of Wynne- 
wood court, will entertain her club at 
lunelieon and bridge Wednesday. 

Mrs. H. F. Darnes, of Grayling 
avenue, is recovering from an opera- 
tion for appendicitis. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Alfred Peeney, of 
Elm terrace, have as their guests,! 




Mrs. Henry Kendig and Mrs. Eugene i 
Weiser. of York. Mr. Weiser will! 
be their guest over the week-end. j 

Mr. and .Mrs. A. II. Durboraw, o['| 
Elmwood avenue, returned recently! 
from Columbus, Ohio, where they j 
spent a week. Mr. Durboraw was the! 
Sabbatical delegate to the Biennial J 
Convention of the United Lutheran j 
Church. | 

They had as their guests for a j 
week, their son-in-law and daughter,! 
Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Malin, of Dills-; 
burg, Pa. I 

Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Fivt/,.: 
of Chestnut avenue, were given a re- j 
ception Sundav afternoon to cole- 1 
brate their .15th wedding anniversary! 
by their sens and daughters-in-law, : 
Mr. and .Airs. William W. Fretz. of 
New York; .Air. and Mrs. Hubert i 
Innes Fretz. of Morion, and Mr. and j 
Mrs. C. Franklin Fretz. of Haddon- ! 
field. X. J. There were 72 guests. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Crumb, of 
Rocky River, Ohio, were the week-! 
end guests of Mr. and Mrs. Char!e~| 
B. Stoudt, of Woodside avenue. i 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Pollock, of j ' 
Avon road, entertained at a dinner i 
Tuesday for Mr. and Mrs. Cy Peter- ' 
man, .Miss Kay Steed and Leo Rior- 
dan. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Adams, of 
Boston, Mass., were the guests of Dr. 
and Mrs. II. J. Sangmeister, of Bryn 
Mawr avenue, Penn Valley, last 
week. Dr. Adams was inducted as 
a fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. Dr. Sangmeister is a fel- 
low of the American College of Sur- 
geons. 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Ervine, of 
12 Narbrook Park, are receiving con- 
gratulations upon the birth of a son. 
James Patterson Ervine, on Thurs- 
day, October 15. 

Mrs. Verna R. Woodcock, of Mont- 
gomery avenue, had as her guest last 
week-end, Mrs. Logan Marshall, of 
South Carolina, regent of the D. A. 
R. of that State. Mrs. Woodcock and 
her guest attended the D. A. R. Con- 
ference in Reading last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Heath, of 
Shirley road, had as their week-end 
guest, Samuel Neall, who is a stu- 
dent at Yale University. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Dothard, of 
Wynnewood road, entertained at a 
dinner Saturday evening. Guests 
were Dr. and Mrs. Harry Weaver, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bailey, of Over- 
brook; Dr. Harriett Hartley, Mrs. 
Fred Hopewell, of Wellesley, Dr. 
Miriam Warner and J. B. Williams. 

Mrs. Louis Weisgerber, Mrs. Garth 
Boericke, Mrs. J. Harold Way and 
Mrs. Robert J. Dothard attended the 
luncheon, bridge party and fashion 
show at the Manufacturers' Club 
Monday. 

Mrs. Dothard spent Tuesday in 
Wilkes-Barre. 

A Hallowe'en party was given Tues- 
day evening for the residents of the 
Windsor-Essex. Those who attended 
were Mrs. Haines, Miss Lafore, Miss 
Hammell, Miss Young, Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Nevins, Mrs. 
Bates, Miss Mary Bates, Mrs. Shaw, 
Miss Betty Jane Shaw, Mrs. Bur- 
chara, Mrs. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Koe- 
niger, Masters Jimmy Koeniger and 
Buddy Koeniger, Miss Mary Koeniger, 
Mrs. Wentzel, Miss Jean Anderson, 
Mrs. Anderson, Miss McNamara, Mr. 
Hegstrom, Mr. Martens, Mr. Smith, 
Mr. Price, Mr. Burgess, Mr. Harter, 
Mr. Andrew and Mr. Gowland. 



New Books at Library 

The following books are recent ac- 
cessions at the Narberth Community 
Library: 

Non-fiction: "A Walk After John 
Keats," by N. S. Bushnell; "The Hu- 
man Body," by Logan Clendcning; 
"Householders' Complete Handbook," 
by Hawthorne Daniel; "After All," 
by Clarence Day; "Art of Block Cut- 
ting," by Hankammer & Lampe; 
"Spoils," by II. S. Hollander; "Negro 
in American Civilization," by C. S. 
Johnson; "Will Rogers' Wit and Wis- 
dom," by Jack Lait; "Letters of 
Charles Lamb," 2v.; "Best Plays of 
1935—1936," by Burns Mantle; "She 
Strives to Conquer," by Frances 
Maule; "This Man Landon," by Fred- 
crick Palmer; "In Pursuit of Laugh- 
ter." by Agnes Repplier; "From For- 
est to Furniture," by Robert Sher- 
wood ; "Men of Danger," by Lowell 
Thomas. 

Fiction: "Cradle of Life," by Louis 
Adamic; "Sense and Sensibility," by 
•lane Austen; "Three Bags Full," by 
Roger Burlingame; "Mary Christ- 
mas," by M. E. Chase; "Whiteoak 
Ilarvest," by Mazo De La Roche; "No 
Hero — This," by Warwick Deeping; 
"While Banners," by L. C. Douglas; 
"Old Ashburn Place," by Margaret; 
Flint; "Lost. Wagon Train," by Zanej 
Grey; "Substitute Guest," by G. L. ! 
Hill; "Moscow Skies," by Maurice | 
Hindus; "Candle Indoors," by Helen! 
Hull; "Great Laughter," by Fannie j 
Hurst; "Scorpion," by Will James;' 
"Two Keys to a Cabin," by Lida Lar-| 
riniore; "Great-Aunt Lavinia," by J.i 
C. Lincoln; "Fire Over England," by | 
A. !•:. \V. Mason; "Love Comes Last,"' 
by II. T. .Miller; "Green Margins," by 
F. P. O'Donnell; "Golden Wedding,"! 
by Anne Parrish; "To Ride the River ; 
With," by W. M. MacLeod; "Sleep-! 
ing Beauty," by Berta Ruck; "Prayer 
for .My Son," by Hugh Walpo'le; ' 
"Law and the McLaugjhlincs," by 
Margaret Wilson; "Fort in the Jun- 



gle," by P. C. Wren. 

Mystery and Detective Stories: 
"Murder in Mesopotamia," by Agatha 
Christie; "Last Will and Testament," 
by G. D. H. Cole; "Wheel That 
Turned," by K. M. Knight; "Bell in 
the Fog," by J. S. Strange; "Kidnap 
Murder Case," by S. S. Van Dine; 
"The Huddle," by Caroline Wells. 

Gift in memory of Misses Anna and 
Mary Mackeag: "Germantown, 1G83 — 
1933," by E. W. Hocker; "Life and 
Letters of John Galsworthy," by H. 
V. Marrot. 

By courtesy of Congressman Ditter 
—"Yearbook of Agriculture, 1936." 

Reference: "Who's Who in Amer- 
ica, 1936—1937." 



Don't tell it all before it happens. 
Save a surprise for the audience. 



Washed Clean, 

Fluffed 

Dry 

and 




APPROVED! 

Rigid inspection after your 
blankets have been washed as- 
sures you the finest, most satis- 
factory laundering. 



St. Mary's) 
Laundry 



\RLA. 



WASHING' METHODS.: 
AND SANITATION-' 

\ CERTIFIED =/ 



Inc. 



Aid. 4400 



Ardmore, Pa. 



The At lette French 
Oil Permanent Wave 



Special, 

Croquignole and Spiral. 

(Regularly #7.50) 



There are many reasons why you'll like this distinc 
tive wave that combines charm with comfort. 

Phone or call, and we'll tell you more 



We also feature 

ZOTOS Pcrmanents 

and FREDERIC 



Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 
— 3 specials for $1 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday 
— 3 specials for #1.25 



IATHLENE 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

43 North Narberth Avenue — Narberth 4077 
300 Levering Mill Road — Phone: Cynwyd 927 

ESTABLISHED SINCE 1924 




STORE HOURS.. 9.30 to 6.00 




EWEEf 

1122-24 CHESTNUT ST 
PHILADELPHIA 

Vogue's Find 
of the Fortnight 

this 

DAMASK 
REVELER 

$29.95 



JBSM 



Frankenfield Funeral Home 

WM. G. PRANKENFIELD 
Simpson Road at Athens Avenue 

ARDMORE, PA 



Telephone Ardmore 9 

2646 



General Wayne Inn 

Montgomery Ave., Merion 

After Complete Renovations — 



NOW OPEN 



eT\ 




All the charm and romance of Colonial Pennsylvania 
has been recaptured in this famous old Revolution- 
ary hostelry. Drive out tonight and enjoy dinner, 
your favorite drink or after-theatre supper. 

Bar & Cocktail Room 

"Maids' Niiiht Out" 

(THURSDAY & SUNDAY) 

Special Dinner 

$^.00 

Attractive Platters 

a Specialty 

• 

STEAKS-CHOPS 

SEAFOOD 

Music Dancing 

Phone Narberth 29S4 
15 minutes from any section of the city 



Keep your news brief. 



Master Watch 
& Clock Repair Co. 

Expert Swiss and American 

Watch Makers 

Complete Repairs as low (PI CA 

Fine Jewelry & Optical Repairs 

69TH STREET TERMINAL 

BRANCH OF 21 S. 18th ST. 
All work guaranteed 
ESTABLISHED 1904 



The 



National Bank of Narberth 

* Deposits Insured under the Government Plan * 

* Member of Federal Reserve System * 

* Open at 8 A. M. daily for your convenience * 



Will It Be A Straight Ticket 

are you going to cut? This may sound politi- 
cal but it's also economical for you to talk to 
us now about STORM SASH and DOORS. 
There is an apparent shortage of "Regular" 
sizes in Storm Sash and if "cut" out special, 
more time than usual will be necessary. Since 
there is nearly always something just around 
the corner, this time it happens to be Winter. 
Cast your vote now for any or all of these 
"Wooden" ones — 

Storm Enclosures 
Bookshelves 
Cabinets 
Folding Screens 
Recreation Rooms 

Call our Home Service Department for advice 
about your Home problems. 

Shull Lumber Company 

The Link Between Forest and Home 

29 Bala Ave., Bala-Cynwyd CYNWYD 6 6 2 

OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 3 P. M. 




^OMESTKtfEAWJUARTEfiS 

AM0S1AN0Y 

- BABV NAMING CONTEST - 
2:832 PRIZES j 



40c 

PEPSODENT 
TOOTH PASTE 



33c 



50c 

PEPSODENT 
TOOTH POWDER 

39« 



Shea's Pharmacy 



IT'S A Hew KIND 
OF CLEANER 



The new Hoover One Fifty Cleaning 
Ensemble doesn't look like any other 
cleaner you ever saw. It's different in 
shape ... in lightness ... in conven- 
iences. But, most important, it's dif- 
ferent in idea! A cleaner for floor 
coverings . . . plus a cleaner for other 
furnishings ... in one complete en- 
semble, instantly convertible. Made 
with magnesium, one-third lighter 
than aluminum. Fifteen major im- 
provements . . . and the cleaning ac- 
tion only Hoover can 
give you — Positive $ 
Agitation. See it, try it, 
no obligation . . . and 
own it for only . . . 




at the Station 
Narberth 2838 



150 

Ja a week 




• Payable Monthly 

SHORT TIME ONLY— Your old electric cleaner accepted 
as down payment on a new Hoover. Balance monthly. 



HOOVER (Mfflj 

STRAWBRIDGE 8c CLOTHIER 



CLEANING 
ENSEMBLE 



The Main Line Store 



On to a festive evening 
— and you, in this 
damask gown, 
sumptuous and 
beautiful. Simply 
shirred bodice with 
tiny straps holding up 
the not-too-low back, 
and a sweeping skirt. 
You'll love it in a 
pale blue or white! 

Misses' Shop — Second Floor 



m 

■am 



liriHiksit 



MMUt - d i iv ii&iBujc^i^imis:^ 



^-•^■~^^--'-" 



Ji,jasiX;.^t»» 



iJ^ij^ggijjj^jg5jigjgl|^jjj^iJig^^gg*S^ 



6&*rf3fc&*l>:W-- 



jK^ajgaasa^jj 



'JU&:vz'i^m*u&X;&uhifc-£Zj,.:i: 



imai 



mmM 






•!«!)¥.■;? fC! J.: :*«!?! 



rt^B^SSf^lSnv^ 



f^^--»i5l^*«-.'t 



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ffiSfffi&i^lttF^^&rt'Zr® WjC^(^Bgt5 



Page Four 



OUR TOWN 



October 30, 1936 



OUR TOWN 

A Co-operative Community Newspaper 
founded in 111] 1 /*.)/ //«; Narberth 
Cieic Association, and published 
every Friday at Narbcrth, Pa. 

IMiilip Atloe 7Jv;ii),'Bloii, I'ublislicr 

Kdvviii I... I'iixson, Kilitoi' 

Anne Morgan IlobiM-lH, Social Kilitor 



Office — 209 Haverford Ave, Narberth 

Telephones— Narberth 4100, Cynwyd 811 
Subscription rate, $2 per year In advance 



Kntr-ruil :is suci)M(l-i'liiHM niiilter Oi-lo- 
bur 1:i, mil, at tin- Pnst OIlb'L' til Nar- 
licrtll, 1'ii., under lilt; Act of .March 3. 
3 8711. 



Friday, October 30. 1936 



That's My Story 



N-irbcrth's Mardi Gras 

Tlu> .Mardi Gras which in its two 

previous yi.'iir.s attracted hundreds of 

u'oplo to Havori'ord avenue and j)i'o- 

.-idvil sai'c harmless amusement for 

he youngsters on JMiscliief Night, is 

lie work ol" the Narberth Business 

Council in name only. Actually, it is 

the doing of a handful of energetic 

mhlic-sjjirited business folk, who with 

nothcr handful of their type, do 

everything the lJusiness Council ever 

does. 

In most organizations it is only the 



Qocal ZMovies I Coming Events 



$7200 a Year? 



i'hrc.e Shows at Narbcrth 
Theatre Mardi Gras Night 
of "Love Before Breakfast" 



County G. O. P. Confident 

But Wants Big Vote 

With better than a three-to-one 
registration of Republicans as com- 
pared with Democrats, Montgomery 
G. O. P. leaders look forward to the 
election, four days hence, with a 
feeling of both confidence and con- 
cern. 

They are confident that they will 
carry the county with a plurality in 
excess of ,'!(),000 — some think it will 
reach -I'i.OOO when the ballots are 
tabulated— and they are at the same 
time concerned lest the highest pos- 
sible Republican vote may not be cast. 

This is a matter of grave concern 
because, with the Democrats lusting 
for a victory in the State, every Re- 
publican vote may be needed to keep 
Pennsylvania in the traditional Re- 
publican column on November 3. 

For this reason effort is to be made 
to get those who oppose the New Deal 
to the polls in such overwhelmingly 
Republican Counties as Montgomery 
and Delaware as well as in those 
areas where the preponderance is less 
pronounced. 

Congressman J. William Ditter is 
more than the head of the Republican 
ticket in Montgomery County, which 
constitutes his congressional district. 
He is conducting a thorough cam- 
paign on his own account. 

Mr. Ditter is convinced, after a 
complete canvass of the county, that 
the Republican margin will be of 
generous proportions. In fact, if the 
trend now in progress continues for 
the next ten days, and he sees no 
reason why it will not, the victory 
will reach landslide proportions. 

By that, Congressman Ditter indi- 
cates that he means the largest Re- 
publican plurality since 1930. 

In Lower Morion, Peter C. Hess is 
quoted as estimating the Republican 
plurality at 10,000. The Abington 
section is expected by those in touch 
with the situation to do as well or 
better. 

Both sections will probably see 
many voters at the polling places this 
year who seldom participate in elec- 
tions. 

Leaders in all parts of the county 
report exceptional interest in the 
presidential contest and the total vote 
is expected to touch an all-time high 
on November 3. 

Reports from the other side of the 
political fence indicate that condi- 
tions among the Democratic brethren 
is anything but satisfactory. They 
admit privately that they are not 
very hopeful. 

The opening of local headquarters 
in various parts of the county give 
a surface appearance of activity, but 
persons in a position to know, report 
that things between the old line Demo- 
crats, led by McAvoy and Guffey, and 
the New Dealers, represented by Sec- 
retary J. Hansell French and other 
late Republicans, are far from the 
perfect political marriage. 

Then there is a group carrying 
considerable influence which is frankly 
and definitely against the New Deal 
as a matter of principle. In this 
group is R. Sturgis Ingersoll and his 
brother, John H. W. Ingersoll. Both 
live in Penllyn and John was at one 
time the Democratic nominee for as- 
sembly. 

These men are open in their pro- 
tests against the policies of Mr. 
Roosevelt and will vote for Landon. 

The latest recruit to this faction is 
Philip C. Pendleton, who was the 
Democratic nominee for Congress six 
years ago. Both Pendleton and 
George W. Norris, the Gwyncdd 
banker, have announced themselves 
for Landon during the past week. 



In keeping with the spirit of fes- 
tivity this Friday evening (Mardi 
Gras Night) Manager Frank Salasin 
has arranged for three shows to be 
given at the Narberth Theatre, 7, !) 
and the final performance starting at 
1 1 o'clock. The feature is Carole 
Lombard, keen exponent of sophisti- 
cated comedy, in "Love Before Break- 
fast," a witty and most entertaining 
few who do the work for the many, picture quite in keeping with the oc- 
casion. This play will also be re- 
peated at Saturday's shows. 

Monday and Tuesday brings to the 
Narberth P. G. Wodehouse's "Picca- 
dilly Jim," with Robert Montgomery. 

June Withers, who is rapidly win- 
ning the place as filmdom's outstand- 
ing adolescent star, on Wednesday 
(Cash Award Night) will be seen in 
"Pepper." Assisting her are Irvin S. 
Cobb and Slim Summerville, which 
augurs well for the picture's humor. 

That noted air picture, "China Clip- 



it is unfortunate that Narberth, its 
c'ivic association long dead, has no 
group of men to function like Bala- 
Cynwyd's Neighborhood Club, Mor- 
ion's and Wynnewood's and Penn Val- 
ley's Civic Associations. It does have, 
fortunately, fine active women's 
groups — Mul'eres to aid the fire corn- 
pan., ; Women's Community Club, 
Senior and Junior branches; Parents- 
Teachers' Association, most influen- 
tial of all, but confined to its own 
province. And Narberth's church or- 
ganizations are strong, as their past „ st;u . rinp Pat O'Brien, will be 
publicity in tremendous streams has ; the attraction on Thursday. 

indicated. And there s the Library j 

Association. But no one group looks l ^ 
after Narberth's interests as a men's 
civic organization should. No group, 
that is. but ihe Business Council. \ 

Really remarkable are the achieve 
ments of this body — Christmas lights, 
donations to the poor, who are under 



I 



Murder in Fleet" at 

Egyptian; "Gorgeous 
Hussy" Due Next Week- 
Comedy, thrills and romance make 
"Murder in the Fleet" unusual enter- 
Mrs. Kherhart Mueller's kindly care; j tainment at the Egyptian Theatre 
station and road sign improvements; ; this Friday and Saturday. The cast 
peddler, huckster and circular dis- i includes Robert Taylor, Una Merkel 
tribution control; Mardi Gras, etc.— j and Jean Parker. The accompanying 
when you consider that of the 150 j bill includes a hilarious Laurel and 
business and professional people in; Hardy farce, "The Live Ghost." 
Narberth, only 70 are remotely in- Timely story of the tempestuous 
terested in the Business Council, and (..lection of Andrew Jackson, "The 
attendance of 20 is a rarity at any: Gorgeous Hussy" will play Monday, 
meeting no matter how great the im-, Tuesday and Wednesday. Lionel 
portance. | Barrymore is superb as the seventh 

Notices were sent to 70 psuedo- j president of the United States; Joan 
members, inviting them to attend the: Crawford enacts the tavern-keeper's 
regular monthly meeting Monday, Oc-j daughter who became Democracy's 
tobcr 12. Four attended. There was! First Lady; and Robert Taylor is a 
no blizzard; most of the rest simply young naval officer, 
were not interested. Treasurer Harry i Thursday, the Egyptian's "Double 
Hollar is snubbed and insulted i' 1 1 Bank Night," "The Crime of Dr. 
store after store, when he calls to j Forbes" will baffle the most astute 
collect dues (reduced recently from ! mys tery-solver. It features taut 
$12 to $G a year). The secretary j (lrama ' ailc i. an unusual love story, 
complained of illness and press of starring Gloria Stuart, Robert Kent 
business and quit last month, and I,! all( j Henry Armetta. 



Hallowe'en dance, Cynwyd Club, 9 
, : . M., Oct.iber 31. 

"The Sleeping Beauty," Erlanger 
Theatre, 10. MU a. m., October 31; 
•'Children's Theatre" of Women's In- 
ternational League. 

Irtne Ginther, nanseiise; Ethel 
Righter Wilson, soprano; Stephen 
Girard Hotel, 8.15 P. M., November 4. 

National Preaching Mission, Con- 
vention Hall, November 29 — Decem- 
ber 2. 

Monte Carlo Ballet Russe, Academy 
of Music, November 10; All-Star Con- 
cert Series. 

Youth Concert, Academy of Music, 
November 18, Stokowski conducting. 



who am fairly busy, after all, was 
forced to be acting secretary. So I'm 
burnt up at the way the bulk of the 
business people leave the work to be 
done by a few, and then crab about 
the things the few try to accomplish. 
It has been proposed to turn the 
Mardi Gras over to the public to do 
with as it pleases. In the meantime, 
after only four officers attended a 
meeting to which 70 members were 



Friday and Saturday, the year's 
funniest comedy is coming — "Kelly 
the Second," with Patsy Kelly and 
Charles Chase. 



Astaire and Rogers 

Liberal With Dances 

in "Swing Time" 

"Swing Time," the new Fred 
invited, President Joe Adelizzi and ■ Astaire-Ginger Rogers musical coming- 
ins workers deserve great credit for i to the Ardmore Theatre this Friday 
their courage in carrying on the: for five days, is more generous to 
Mardi Gras plans. Weather permit- those who eagerly wait for the nimble- 
ting, tonight's affair will be a sue- \ footed pair to present the last word 

in team dancing than any of their pre- 



cess — but it will not redound credit 
to most of the Narberth business 
men. 

TOM ELWOOD. 



Boro American Legion 



vious features. 

Now they may be seen in four dis- 
tinctive numbers set to the rhythms 
of "The Way You Look Tonight," 



General Wayne's Reopening 
Recalls Hostelry's History 

Continue*! from 1'age One 
ton's headquarters over night while 
his men encamped nearby, September 
14, 1777, on his way to Valley Forge 
— commemorated by a D. A. R. tablet 
which now stands in front of Al- 
brocht's nursery at Meeting House 
lane. 

Opening of the Old Lancaster road, 
and establishment of the Philadelphia 
and Lancaster Stage Coach line made 
it a busy and important station. 

Anthony Wayne, for whom the 
Main Line town Louella now Wayne, 
was named, came down the Lancaster 
road February (5, 1795, fresh from 
the battle of Fallen Timbers. Hav- 
ing won for his country the terri- 
tory between the Ohio and the Mis- 
sissippi, he was the hero of the day. 
At Streeper's Tavern three troops of 
Philadelphia Light Horse met, receiv- 
ed him with ceremony, and escorted 
him to Philadelphia. From that day 
to this the place has been known as 
the General Wayne Inn. 

In 1830 it became the very first 
(and for many years the only) post 
office of the township. From 1800 
to 1807 township elections were held 
there, and until recently it has been 
polling place for the General Wayne 
Election District of Lower Morion. 
The Philadelphia and Columbia Rail- 
road in 1834 crossed the inn's prop- 
erty, and its stone bridge until re- 
cently stood across the road from 
the inn. The first Township Com- 
missioners held their first meeting 
there. Morion Chapter, Daughters of 
the Revolution, held its inaugural 
meeting there April 17, 1895. 

Many famous personages visited 
the inn. My Lord Cornwallis sat in 
one of those embrasured windows and 
watched his orderlies lead horses to 
the smith across the road (now a 
gasoline station.) MacPherson and 
McClenachan planned raids for their 
privateersmen and divided the spoils, 
under the rough rafters by flickering 
candlelight. (Blair McClenachan, 
whose privateers preyed upon British 
merchant ships, was a member of 
Congress from 1797 to 1799. He 
lived in a house on the Old Gulph 
road at Mill Creek that was built or 
owned by John Roberts.) 

A pane of glass in one of the win- 
dows of what in his day was a sit- 
ting room still bears the name of 




KENNETH L. M. PRAY 
wlto declined to comment on a 
Republican State Committee as- 
sertion that he receives $000 
monthly as technical staff licad 
of Governor Earle's Committee 
on Public Assistance and Relief. 
Mr. Pray, former Narberth School 
Board president and now member 
of borough Recreation Board, di- 
>ects the Pennsylvania School for 
Social Work, Philadelphia. 



"Quakerism" Topic at Two 
Meetings During November 



j A series of two meetings will be 

'held at the Old Morion Meeting House 

! on Montgomery avenue and Meeting 
House lane in the month of Novem- 
ber. The topic will be "Quakerism in 

Morion;" the speaker, Samuel J. 

i Bunting, Jr. 

The first of the series will be held 
Sunday, November 1 , at 8 P. M., and 

lis entitled "The Historical Approach; 
a history of Merion and the Welsh 

i Settlement." 

The second will lie November 29 at 
:( P. M., the topic: "The Religious 
Aspect of the Society of Friends." The 
public is cordially invited. 



Clarke Wins Son's Custody 

Tearful was the protest of Thomas 
Clarke when he heard he had been 
j awarded to the custody of his father, 
j Charles John Clarke, Merion artist. 
! But the storm died away after a 
I half hour and Clarke left Domestic 
jRelations Court, Philadelphia, Wednes- 
day with the 13-year-old son whose 
unmanageability and "hyperactivity" 
had been described by a court psy- 
chiatrist. 

Thomas has been living with his 
mother Mrs. Mildred Clarke, 39, the 
former Mildred G. Brelsford, most of 
the time since his parents separated 
September 2. They were married in 
11922. 

Clarke lives at 523 Howe road, Mer- 
ion, and his wife gave her address as 
the Belgravia. 



The Political Pot 

Continued from I'age One 

quarters, Friday night by Harold 
Scott, former commander of the Mer- 
ion Post, American Legion, and chair- 
man of the Republican Citizens' Com- 
m'ttee and Frank A. Schrepfer, Nar- 
berth, former National Commander of 
the Military Order of the Purple 
Heart. 

* * * 

Larger contributions to the Repub- 
lican campaign filed with the House 
in' Representatives include: $1250, 
Edward S. Wagner, Merion; $1000 
each, William P. Gcst, Merion, and 
W. M. and Edith Irish, Overbrook; 
$500 each, John A. Lafore, Penn Val- 
ley; Henry S. Drinker, Merion; Gus- 
tavus W. Cook, Wynnewood, and II. 
M. League, Overbrook. 

* * * 

Montgomery County is surpassed 
only by Philadelphia and Lackawanna 
Counties in the sale of Landon-Knox 
"Dollar Certificates." A total of 
5749 certificates have been sold in 
this county, under the chairmanship 
of Mrs. Joseph H. Beerer, of Norris- 
town. 

The greatest Democratic vote on 
the Main Line in recent years will 
be cast Tuesday, according to Charles 
W. Gamble, Haverford attorney and 
Democratic campaign manager in 
Lower Morion Township and Narberth 
Borough. "We feel sure of carrying 
five of the twenty districts," he said, 
and "the vote will compare favor- 
ably with that of 1933, when William 
F. Dannehower, Montgomery County 
Judge, lost the township by only G10 
votes." 

Governor George II. Earle, of Hav- 
erford, will wind up the Democratic 
campaign on the Main Line Monday 
night, when he will address a rally in 
Williamson Hall, 44 West Lancaster 
avenue, Ardmore. 

Other rallies scheduled by the 
Democrats include one in Ardmore and 
Gladwyne Friday night. 

Speakers at the Ardmore rally, 
which will bo held at the Merion Fire 
Company Hall, 35 Greenfield avenue, 
will include Samuel K. White, Mer- 
ion, Assemblyman candidate; Adrian 
Bonnelly, of Overbrook, State Deputy 
Attorney General, and James M. 
Webster, of the Democratic State 
Speakers' Bureau. 

The same speakers are scheduled for 
the Gladwyne rally. 

A rally was held at Democratic 
headquarters in the old bank build- 
ing, Bala-Cynwyd, Wednesday eve- 
ning. 



New Scarlet Fever Case 

James Carr, 6, of Merion avenue, 
Narberth, a pupil at St.' Margaret's 
School, is reported to have scarlet 
fever by Health Officer George B. 
Suplee. This is the sixth case re- 
cently reported in the borough. 



IT'S TRUE! 



By Wiley Padan 



! "Never Gonna Dance," "Pick Yourself | Fdgar Allen Poo, inscribed by him 



Installs New Officers' Up" and "Waltz in Springtime," all evidently by writing with a diamond. 

The inn, which languished during 
Prohibition, had a brief period of 
prosperity following Repeal, but after 
a year or so of inactivity, it remained 
for I. Newton Smith and his asso- 



Contlnued from race One j by Jerome Kern, who scored this RKO 

battles and was wounded while under i radio picture. 

i ' 
machine gun fire. j . 

The speaker was decorated with the ! R C p UO lJ can i snl Versus 

Silver Star, Order of The Purple | D u r» U T.e, „ 

„ . ' „ i i,t i i p Roosevelt Only Issue 

Heart, Croix de Guerre and Medal of ! 

Merit. 

It was announced Judge Harry S. 

McDcvitt, Philadelphia, will be the 



at Tuesday's Polls j ciatca t0 , restorc il , t " an «P1>™^ 

! better than ever before m its his- 



Contlnued from Pnse One 

roll up a tremendous margin for Lan- 
speaker at the Armistice Day Ban- j ( , on am , Rnox . f th( , national tickct is 

quet November 11. Arranging the j to carrv Peiinsv i vania . 

affair are Messrs. Durbin, Fryc, Wnn- 1 t)km ; . g ^ of courgCj for thig 



tory, and a return to what promises 
to be an era of good food, good liquor 
and pleasant popular hospitality. 



dor, Cooke and A. Perry Redifor. 

The Legionnaires planned to turn 
over the surplus from the post's 
Fourth of July activities to the bor- 



extraordinary courtesy that is being 
shown to Democrats by the Republican 
leaders. Chiefly, it is because the 
G. O. P. heads feel sure that the old- 



ough Recreation Board as the nucleus j f . lshiolled Democrats will feel more 
of a worthy community cause. j at h()mG undel . the Landon-Knox ban- 
nor than they will with the New Deal 




Another Main Line appointment is 
George E. Gillespie, Cynwyd, a mem- 
ber of the Thomas D. Vandivcr Post, 
Bala-Cynwyd, who will serve on the 
resolutions committee. 



party. 



Letters of 150 words or less wel- 
comed. 

Boil it down. It reads better. 



Local Legionnaires Named 

on District Committees 



Committee appointments for the 
Ninth District of the American Le- 
gion announced by Harold L. Reese, 
Wynnewood, commander of the dis- 
trict, include the reappointment of 
Frank S. Challenger, Narberth, as 
deputy district commander. Challen- 
ger is a member of the Harold D. 
Speakman Post in Narberth. 

Henry A. Frye, another member of 
the Narberth post, has been appointed 
judge advocate for the Ninth District. 



THEATRE 



Fri., Sat., Sun., Mon., Tues. 

Oct. 30, 31 — Nov. 1, 2, 3 

FRED ASTAIRE 

GINGER ROGERS 

"SWING TIME" 

with 

Victor Moore Helen Broderlck 

Eric Blore Betty Furness 



Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 

November 4, 5, 6 

JOAN CRAWFORD 

ROBERT TAYLOR 

FRANCHOT TONE 

"THE GORGEOUS HUSSY" 

with 

Lionel Barrymore James Stewart 



Get Those 
Hallowe'en 

masks, costumes, noise- 
makers and candies at 

DAVIS' 

Oldest Store in Narberth 

224 Haverford Avenue 



Mardi Gras Night 

Three Shows 
7-9-11 P. M. 

CAROLE LOMBARD 

in Faith Baldwin's 

"LOVE 

BEFORE 

BREAKFAST" 

Enjoy the Mardi Gras and attend 
the Narbcrth Theatre 



Added Saturday at 1 P. M. 

Special Feature for Children 




ROBERT 

TRyiPR'5 

REAL NAME 1$ 
SPANGLER 
ARLINGTON 
BROUGH. 

'In ORDER TO KEEP 
CHICKENS QUIET 
ON '11*. GORGEOUS 
HUSSY' SET, THE- 
PROPERTY MAN HAD 
TO FEED THEM EVERY 
FIVE MINUTES !" 



With his arm in a 75 pound 
cast, due to a serious injury, 

CLARENCE BROWNI 

DIRECTED "THE GORGEOUS HUSSy 
FROM A COUCM ! HE HAS DIRECTED 
<JOAN CRAWFORD IN "POSSESSED", 
"SADIE McKEE", a^e. "CHAINED", 



FRANCHOT TONE 

WENT TO SCHOOL IN 

NIAGARA FALLS, 

■ PENNSYLVANIA-, 

SARANAC LAKE 

ARIZONA- 

CORNELL » 




DWORD 



SAYS THAT Of HER MANY PICTURES, PERHAPS 
HER FAVORITE IS "DANCING Y^T.-.tj^me^^-vUt? 



"The Gori/eons Hassi/" is based on Samuel Hopkins Adams' famed story 
of Peiigy O'Neal, beautiful dauyliter of a Washington tavern-keeper who 
yuincd glamorous political power during the days of Andretv Jackson. 
It's at the Egyptian next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Mon., Tues., Wed. m EGYPTIAN 



October 30, J 936 



OUR TOWN 



Page Five 



Committee Chairmen 
for Garden Club 



Soloist 



Mrs. William Kurtz Myers 
Names Heads for Ac- 
tivities 



MEETS NEXT THURSDAY 



Tlie Garden Club of Bala-Cymvyd 
will meet at the Woman's Club Thurs- 
day, November !>, at 10 A. M. Mrs. 
William Kurtz Myers, president, will j 
preside and Mrs. Arthur Hoyt Scott,' 
of Swarthmore, will talk on "Garden 
Club of America in Japan and 
France," illustrated by pictures. This 
will be an open meeting. 

Mrs. Myers has appointed the fol- 
lowing as chairmen: program, Mrs. 
Richard W. Thorington, of Wynne- 
wood; conservation, Mrs. Ralph Light; 
flowers for members, Mrs. Clarence 
T. Faries, of Wynnewood ; flowers for 
floworless Philadelphia, Mrs. Roy E. 
Clark, of Cynwyd; Flower Mart, Mrs. 
John M. Young, of Cynwyd; hospi- 
tality, Mrs. L. Herbert Tily, of Cyn- 
wyd; membership, Mrs. Perry U. 
Richards, of Ardmore; publicity, Mrs. 
Walter C. Neely, of Merion; proper- 
ties, Mrs. Matthew McVickar, Jr., of 
Cynwyd, and pilgrimages, Mrs. 
Thomas Cullinan. Others will be an- 
nounced later. 



Boy Scout Notes 





District Awards Presented 
Four Main Line Troops received the 
District Award for maintaining a 
consistent program of scouting 
throughout the summer months. They 
were Ardmore No. 3, Bala-Cynwyd 
No. 2, Merion No. 2, and Wynnewood 
No. 1. The award presented is one 
of several which a troop must earn in 
order to receive the Council Award. 
Becomes Eagle Scout 
Last Monday night at the weekly 
troop meeting, Donald Love, of 
Wynnewood No. 1 , received the high- 
est award which scouting can give. 
C. B. Clipsham, chairman of the 
Court of Honor for the Main Line 
District presented him with the Eagle 
badge, evidence of earning twenty-one 
merit badges. Donald is Senior pa- 
trol leader of the Wynnewood Troop 
and a member of the Order of the 
Arrow, Delmont organization for 
those scouts who display outstanding 1 
qualities of character and leadership. 
At the same troop meeting, W. J. 
Drennen, chairman of the District Ac- 
tivities' Committee, presented the 
Wynnewood Troop with District 
Awards for maintaining a complete 
program of scouting throughout the 
summer, for the Valley Forge Pil- 



Mnsenm Lectures 
Certain grades have heard talks 
from speakers from the Commercial 
and University Museums. 

The first one of these was on Oc- 
tober 12, on "The Stone Age." This 
was for the third and seventh grades. 
On the same day a lecture was given 
to the second and fifth grades on 
Southwest Indians. 

The third, fifth, sixth and eighth 
grades heard a talk on trees on Oc- 
tober 20. 

We hope to hear the following: 
November 20— Pottery. Grades: 3, 
6, 7, 8. 

January 12, 1937 — Chinese Life. 
Grades: 4, G, 7. 

February 9— The Eskimo. Grades: 
| 1,2. 

i February 15— Our Winter Bird 
j Friends. Grades: 1, 2, 3. 
i April 19 — Conquest of Mexico and 
! Peru. Grades: 3, 5, 7. 
! May 7 — Insect Wonders. Grades: 

■ ^~ j 2, 4, G, 7, 8. 

Narberth Bridge Club j Assembly 

Wednesday evening, October 21—! Our last assembly program was 

* , „ „, i m,.,,.w. sponsored bv Mr. Harkness. Two his- 

Top score, C. A. Hammer and Charles " • , 

1 i torv plays were given by the eighth 

B. Stoudt; second place, Mrs. C. A. ■ ^.^ 'representing the March of 
Hammer and Mrs. Charles B. Stoudt. Time. After this we saw a Red 

Friday afternoon — Top score, Miss ( Cross picture on Flood Relief. Wo 
Anna V. Foley and Mrs. T. W. Blake; 

second place, Mrs. Charles B. Stoudt school for the Junior Red Cross, 
and Mrs. M. C. Hinehaugh, Jr. 

Saturday evening — Top score, Mr 
and Mrs. C. Alfred l'ecney; seconc 
place, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Mutton. 



Dorothy Johnstone Baseler, the 
iccll-konioi harpist, who will he 
the soloist at the Reciprocity 
Lancheon of the Sarherth Wom- 
en's Community Clah Tuesday. 



Pcnn Valley Garden Club 

The Executive Board of the Pcnn 
Valley Garden Club will meet Thurs- 
day, November 5, at the home of Mrs. 
Ernest C. Drew on Moreno road, Pcnn \~ ^ t]ics 
Valley. ' 

The next meeting of the club will 
be Monday morning, November 9, at 
10.30 at the home of Mrs. J. Bruce 
Byall on Bryn Mawr avenue, Pcnn 
Valley. 

Mrs. George Batchelder will speak 
on "Forcing Bulbs." 



having a special drive in the 

If 
each person brings some money, no 
matter how little, it will be greatly 
appreciated. 

Pai>ils Answer Phone 
When Mr. Drennen and Miss Fra- 
lantoni both find it impossible to be 
in the office, they select certain pupils 
in the school to take their places. 
Then there will he someone there to 
mswer the telephone. We ask you 
;e youngsters if they get 
confused or are a little slow because 
they arc not accustomed to it. We 
think this will be good experience for 



them and if they are given your co- 
operation, they will take care of 
your messages. 

Marionette Show 

From the Hanley Marionette Show 
there was a balance of $3.5G. This 
was given to the school paper, The 
Sun Dial, to help its expenses. 

HELEN WIPF. 
Assembly 

The fifth grade had a very inter- 
esting assembly period. They learned 
about the uses of hemlock today and 
how the Indians used hemlock. They 
sang songs and recitations about 
trees. The fifth grade also planted a 
beautiful state hemlock tree in front 
of the school. 

Mnseam Case Exhibit.* 

The summer school art class made 
some very interesting articles, which 
are now being exhibited in the mu- 
seum case in the lower floor of the 
main building. 

The museum case is simply a case 
showing different things from all the 
countries of the world. The articles 
that are being exhibited are as fol- 
lows: Indian pottery, homes of In- 
dians, gods of Indians made of card- 
hoard and painted, an Egyptian 
scene, and art project correlated with 
English made of soap, old-fashioned 
dolls and an early German village. 
These projects arc very well done 
and everyone enjoys looking at them. 
VIRGINIA KNAPP. 



ment to Annapolis from former U. S. 
Senator George Wharton Pepper and 
was graduated from the Naval Acad- 
emy June 5, 1930. 

On June 14, 1930, he married Miss 
Mary Dold, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. P. Dold, of Narberth, at a mili- 
tary wedding at St. John's Church, 
Cynwyd. 

He was the son of Captain and Mrs. 
Fred C. Patten, formerly of Narberth, 
and is also survived by a brother, 
Fred C. Patten, Jr., and a thrce-and- 
onc-half-year-old daughter. 

Captain Fred C. Patten is the 
founder and registrar of the Admiral 
Farragut Academy on Toms River, 
N. J., and formerly was connected 
with the Valley Forge Military Acad- 
emy. 



Classmates to Honor 

R. M. Patten's Memory 

Continued from Page One 

into the sea after colliding with an- 
other airplane during fleet maneuvers 
100 miles west of the Canal Zone. 

He is buried in the National Ceme- 
tery at Arlington. 

At Lower Merion High School, from 
which he graduated in 1925, Lieuten- 
ant Patten was quarterback on the 
football team and a member of the 
baseball team. He attended the 
Severn School, Severn Park, Md., for 
a year and then received an appoint- 



Club Women Enjoy 

Franklin Institute Trip 

Two hundred and eighty-five club 
women from Montgomery and Dela- 
ware Counties attended the meeting 
at the Franklin Museum last Thurs- 
day afternoon. They were welcomed 
by Mrs. John A. Adee, vice-president 
of the Montgomery County Federa- 
tion, and Mrs. Leroy Smith, president 
of the Delaware County Federation. 
Mrs. Leon Webster Melcher was ap- 
pointed press and publicity chairman 
for Montgomery County. 

M ss Eleanor O'Kanc spoke of her 
experiences in Spain and gave an out- 
line of the character of the Spaniard. 

Guy Marriner, assistant director of 
music of the Institute, gave a short 
talk on Music Appreciation and 
played several solos. 

This was followed by a visit to the 
Planetarium and a trip through the 
museum. 



Red Cross in Readiness 

for Annual Roll 



Call 



The regular monthly meeting of the 
Main Line Branch No. 1, Southeastern 
Pennsylvania Chapter, American Red 
Cross, was held in headquarters in the 
Times Medical Building, Tuesday, 
with Mrs. Henry C. Earnshaw pre- 
siding. 

The Braille Department reported 
new rooms have been opened in the 
Times Medical Building for the print- 
ing of Braille hooks. More volunteers 
are needed for this work. 

Mrs. Charles S. Starr, chairman of 
Membership, stated that everything 
is in readiness for the drive which 
begins Armistice Day, November 11. 
In connection with this a Roll Call 
Luncheon will be held in the Merion 
Cricket Club on Monday, November 9, 
at 12.30 P. M. This luncheon will be 
followed by a brief moving picture 



The Executive Board of the Merion 
branch of the League of Women Vo- 
ters met at the home of the chairman, 
Mrs. J. Alden TifTt on Baird road, 
Merion, Wednesday. A luncheon 
followed. 



COAL 

Fresh mined Grade A 

Buck 
Pea 



Nut 
Stove 



#7.50 
8.50 
10.00 
10.25 



Coke (Fairmont) $9 

Building Materials 
Wood 

LAIR D 

31 Bala Ave., Bala-Cynwyd 
CYNWYD 2004 



The Main Line Branch No. 1, 
Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter, 
American Red Cross, is sponsoring a 
class in Home Hygiene and Care of 
the Sick, which will meet one after- 
noon a week for one hour and a half. 

Anyone interested in taking this 
course please communicate before No- 
vember 6 with the American Red 
Cross, Times Medical Building, Ard- 
more. Telephone Ardmore 4077. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



Kansas City, and Mr. and Mrs. John 
A. Davis, of Hardingville, N. J. 
On their return from a wedding 
grimage, and for meritorious showing trip through the south, Mr. and Mrs. 



at the Camporee. 



Burt will live in Haddon Heights. 



Reception Follows Wedding 
of Charlotte Deacon Moore 
to A. D. Burt in New Jersey 



Classified 
Advertisements 



— will be charged only to residents 
whose names appear in the tele- 
phone directory or to subscribers 
to OUI1 TOWN or the NEWS OF 
UALA-CYNWYH. 

15c a line 
for Both Newspapers 

Count five words to line 

— will he accepted up to Wednes- 
day, 5 o'clock, for Friday's issues. 



Phone: NARBERTH 4100 



clit-r 



For Sale 

Spaniels, pedigreed, reasonable, 
nan — si 
1'hone Germantown 



An out-of-town wedding of interest j 
took place last Saturday afternoon 
at four o'clock when Miss Charlotte! 
Deacon Moore, daughter of Mr. and i 
Mrs. Charles Moore, of Bridgeton, ! 
New Jersey, became the bride of A1-! 
exander Dean Burt, son of Mr. and : 
Mrs. John Burt, of Narberth, in the ', 
Cohansey Baptist Church, at Roads- , 
town, New Jersey. The Rev. William 
Allister MacKenzie, pastor of the 
church, performed the ceremony. ! 

The bride was given away by her i 
father. j 

Mrs. Stiles Dean Ezell, of Middle- j 
town, N. Y., was the matron of honor. I C(M ' k 

! I IV 

The bridesmaids were the Misses ; $\r,' ; - S |o .Stockton ni 

Kathryn Fry, Nora Smith and Marie j ■'-<>'■'• 

Cairns, of Philadelphia, and Helen 
Hardester, of Haddon Heights, New 

Jersey. I LOST. Ocl. 2\. large Fox Terrier, male; 

_. .',.-, • i „ T T , i c ii : resembles hunting dog : wearing no col- 

David Cunningham, of Haddonfield, j ,.„.. whlte llu(lv blw „ sl)ol , m h . R .,. um , 

N. J., was the best man. The ushers; heart-shaped brown spot on side; browi 
included: Dr. Stiles Dean Ezell, of 
Middletown, New York; Dr. Kenneth 
Fry and Cyrus Coulton, of Philadel- 
phia, and William Cotringer, of Had- 
donfield. 

A reception held at Ivy Manor fol- 
lowed the ceremony. The hostesses 
were Mrs. William Cotringer and 
Mrs. Crane, of Haddonfield, and Mrs. 
Cyrus Coulton, of Philadelphia. 

Receiving with the bridal party was 
Miss Elizabeth Burt, sister of the 
groom. 

Among the out-of-town guests were 
Miss Clara Melville, Mrs. Nellie Cor- 
son, Miss Virginia McCleavy, Miss 
Marguerite Barnett, Miss Elizabeth \ 
Yocum, Mrs. Maude Cook, Mrs. 
Leamy, Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Spangler, 
Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Nye, Dr. Edwin 
L. Lame, Dr. and Mrs. David Dewey 
Detar, and Mr. and Mrs. John M. 



Lost 



& white head and brown tip on tail. 
Xanie is Spotty. Reward. F. A. XleShanc, 
:i."p llampstead circle, Wynnewood. Aril. 
^s-W. 



Help Wanted 

Female Help Wanted — eitoi '1 1KTKKS, 

experienced on infants' hand-made 

bootees and sacones. Write (.'has. .Metz. 

11 X. Sixth St., l'liila., l'a. (,",) 

Situations Wanted 

JANITOR SERVICE in exc. for rent. Or 
full time witli pay. Slier. 8 U5U. (3) 

At Your Service 

RELIABLE t'Altl'KXTUIt. alterations. 

wcatherstripping. Gottlieb Esslinger, 

1-2 (.'onway avenue. Call Narberth 37I8-R. 

(tf) 



CAltPKNTEK- LUILUEU — Estimates 
I cheerfully furnished. Jobbing promptly 
attended to. Leander Wickman, 305 Con- 
way ave.— Narberth 3SS8-W. (5) 

DRAPERIES," ~S~Iip Covers" Venetian 
blinds, Awnings, Furniture, Upholster- 
ing, Beddings, Rugs cleaned, repaired 
and stored. Challenger, 281 Montgomery 

,-, , ii * m -i j i i • *t i av enue, Cynwyd. Phone, Cynwyd 85. 

Enburg, all of Philadelphia. Mr. and For merly with John Wanamaker. (tf) 

Mrs. Charles R. Starn, of Narberth; upHOLSTERlNtJ and 
Miss Alice Moore, of East Orange, 



rep. Springs of 
I 3-pleco suites repaired, $10; Chair re- 
,. , ,, „ , . „ covered, $5. Go anywhere. Call Lewis, 

N. J.; Mr. and Mrs. Cotringer, of 227 E. Lancaster ave. Wayne 1496. 



Haddonfield; Mrs. Alexander Dean 
Burt, Miss Geneva Burt, and Rev. 
and Mrs. J. U. Selwyn Toms, of Wen- 
onah, N. J.; Mrs. James Moser, of 



Real Estate for Rent 

HOUSE & Apt. rentals all along the 
"Main Line." Koser Bros., Realtors. 
"At Ardmore Station" — Ardmore 680. 



To Republican and Democratic 

VOTERS! 

ROOSEVELT 

WILL CARRY 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

WHY? 

Thousands of Republicans throughout the nation, ivith the 
Democrats, are supporting and voting for the present Gov- 
ernment because: 

1. The United States is functioning again. 1 

2. We will not entrust our future to the Hoover- 
Grundy candidate. 

3. President Roosevelt has led us out of the 
depression. 

4. President Roosevelt is fair to all classes. 

5. Real Estate in the cities, suburbs and farm 
districts again has value. 

6. The Mercantile trade is showing a steady- 
increase in volume. 

7. Factories in the county are again in oper- 
ation. Working night and day. 

Vote for ROOSEVELT 
Make One Cross 



MAKE NO OTHER MARKS. 



DEMOCRATIC COUJSTY COMMITTEE. 



^^rfpy^^i^A^^&^i^^^^^W^^S^ 



'^f^f^^^'^S^F^T^^^rf^r^.fjii^: 



Page Six 



OUR TOWN 



October 30, 1936 



'16 High School Class| 
Members Hold Reunion ! 



Bus Driver Made Honorary 

Member; President Comes 

From Boston 



SEVERAL JOIN GROUP! 

Members oi' Lower Morion High 
School's graduating class of lOlfi saw 
L. M. H. S. varsity defeat West Phila- 
delphia High, 13-0, last Saturday, 
and then enjoyed a 20th reunion at 
the Llanerch Country Club. 

Presiding was William Shupert, 
class president, who came from Bos- 
ton to attend the event. 

Made honorary member with a de- 
gree of "Master of Science in Trans- 
portation" was Bartholomew "Bat" 
Cassidy, veteran school bus driver. 

Reminiscences were given by these 
teachers Samuel Shanaman, William 
P. Nash, Frank V. Rinohart and Miss 
Ethel Baker, and by these class mem- 
bers : 

Judge Miller, William McDowell, 
Herbert Packer, Grace Stillwagon 
Davis, Dr. L. R. Davis, .Joseph Allen, 
Harry Swing, John C. Winters, Mrs. 
Mary Scott McShane and James Os- 
mond. 

New members taken in by vote of 
the class are: 

Miss Dorothy Holland, Miss Ethel 
Baker, William I*. Nash, W. Ivan 
Simpson, Rinchart, Shanaman and 
Cassidy. 

Arranging the affair was this com- 
mittee: .Mrs. .Mary Scott McShane. 
chairman; .Mr.-. Jean Hammer llapp. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Duress, Mrs. Dorothy 
Burns Packer, Mrs. Ameda Parker 
Johnson. Frank C. Benson, llarr\ 
Swing. Joseph B. Allen, Alexander 
Davission. John Winters. 

Among those present Were Pr. am' 
Mrs. l.awi-.'iice Davis. Na' berth; M 
Kathe'ine f'utcher, Mr. an.! Mi's. ... 
exander Holcombe, Miss Evelyn Ir- 
win, Mrs. I.o.'lso Keele Tow... il 1 
Margaret Milligan, Mr. and Mr- 
John Winters, all of Ba!a-C . : >.', 
Mr. and Mrs. V. A. McSiiane. -ir. 
Wynnewood. 

Merion Notes 

Mrs. Frederick S. Kirk, of Indian 
Creek road. Overbrook. will give a 
luncheon and bridge party Wednes- 
day, November 11, in boa. a - of Mis 
Margaret Mann Pri/.er daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. 11. Attmore Prizer, of 
Berkley road. Morion, whose marriage 
to Mr. Henry Paneoast Huey will faki 
place December 8 in the Bryn Mawi 
Presbyterian Church. 

Miss Katherine Wetherill, of Mer- 
ion, will entertain at a luncheon 
bridge and shower in honor of Miss 
Prizer November 20, and Mrs. D. 
Webster Bell, of Merion, at a lunch 
eon and bridge November 25. 

Mrs. George S. Heston, of Wynne 
wood, will entertain at a tea in honor 
of Miss Prizer November 20. 

Mrs. E. Holt Eliason. of Valle> 
View road, entertained her club al 
luncheon and bridge Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Macbeth, 
of Beacom lane, had as their week 
end guests Dr. and Mrs. John Frei- 
hert, of Watcrbury, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Macbeth spent sev 
eral days in Atlantic City this week. 

Miss Gretchon Myers, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Kurtz Myers, 
of Winding Way, who is on a trip 
around the world, sailed from Hono- 
lulu on Monday for Aukland, New 
Zealand, where she will spend ten 
days before leaving for Sydney, Aus- 
tralia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Smith, of 
Merion road, entertained at a birth- 
day party Saturday in honor of their 
daughter, Miss Mary Smith, to cele- 
brate her eighth birthday. There were 
18 guests. 

Miss Eleanor DeVilbiss, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. DeVilbiss, of 
Berkley road, spent the week-end at 
Wellesley visiting her sister, Miss Ja- 
net DeVilbiss, who has just become 
a member of the Zeta Alpha Society. 
Miss Janet DeVilbiss is a member 
of the Junior Class at Wellesley Col- 
lege. 

Miss Jacqueline Bird, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Montgomery 
Bird, of Beacom road, will spend the 
week-end at Bethlehem, where she 
will be among the guests at a house 
party to be given by Lehigh Univer- 
sity. 



Hedgerow on Three-Day 

Schedule During November 

Following its autumn custom the 
Hedgerow Theatre at Moylan will be 
open Thursdays, Fridays and Satur- 
days only during November. The 
playhouse's schedule for the coming 
week is: This Friday, "An American 
Tragedy," Dreiser-Piscator; this Sat- 
urday, "Cast Up by the Sea, the Lea- 
cock-Farmer travesty; next Thursday, 
Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night." 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 



POLITICAL ADV. 




OPEN LETTER 



To Those on Relief and WPA: 

There will be those who, on Tuesday next, will attempt to make political capital out of your mis- 
fortunes. They will insult you with the demand that you vote as they order. 

ANYONE WHO ATTEMPTS SUCH A THING WILL BE COMMITTING A CRIM- 
INAL OFFENSE. 

They may seek to justify their impudence by telling you that the New Deal has been provid- 
ing for your needs and, therefore, it is your duty to vote for the New Deal candidates in this election. 

THAT IS CHEAP FALSE PRETENSE. EVERY DOLLAR THAT GOES INTO 
EVERY GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITY, INCLUDING RELIEF AND WPA, COMES 
FROM THE PEOPLE OF THIS COUNTRY — FROM YOUR FELLOW AMERICAN 
CITIZENS. 

They may whisper some threat. 

WE ARE ADVISING YOU— AND WE ARE ADVISING THEM— THAT ANY 
PERSON WHO ATTEMPTS TO INTERFERE WITH YOUR RIGHT TO VOTE, OR 
WHO ATTEMPTS TO INTIMIDATE YOU IN THE EXERCISE OF THAT RIGHT, 
IS SUBJECT TO $1000 FINE AND IMPRISONMENT FOR TWO YEARS. 

They may try to tell you that they will know how you voted. 

ANY SUCH STATEMENT WILL BE ABSOLUTELY FALSE. WITH THE VOTING 
BOOTH CURTAIN CLOSED, NO VOTING MACHINE CLICK, NO IDENTIFYING 
MARK UPON THE PAPER BALLOT, CAN INFORM ANYONE HOW YOU VOTED. 
IF YOU VOTE BY PAPER BALLOT, FOLD THE BALLOT BEFORE YOU LEAVE THE 
BOOTH. AFTER THE JUDGE OR INSPECTOR CHECKS THE NUMBER ON THE 
PERFORATED STUB AT UPPER RIGHT-HAND CORNER OF THE BALLOT, TEAR 
OFF AND KEEP THAT STUB. THEN PERSONALLY THRUST THE BALLOT INTO 
THE BALLOT BOX. 

Further than that — 

IF ANY ELECTION OFFICER COULD LEARN HOW YOU VOTED, AND THEN 
DISCLOSED THAT INFORMATION TO ANYONE, THE PUNISHMENT IS $1000 
FINE AND TWO YEARS IN JAIL. 

The right to vote is the foundation — the bed-rock — of representative government. For a 
century and a half that right, and that alone, has enabled the people of this country to select their 
public officials and determine the laws and governmental principles under which they desired to 
live. 

When you go to the polling place on Tuesday next, REMEMBER THIS: 

The Constitution guarantees to every qualified voter — irrespective of race, creed or color 
—not only the RIGHT TO VOTE, but the right to vote SECRETLY— EACH ACCORDING 
TO HIS AND HER OWN CONSCIENCE— ABSOLUTELY FREE FROM INTERFER- 
ENCE OR INTIMIDATION BY ANYONE. 

AND THE PENAL LAWS OF PENNSYLVANIA BACK UP THAT CONSTITU- 
TIONAL GUARANTEE WITH HEAVY FINES AND PRISON SENTENCES. 

ALONE WITH YOUR CONSCIENCE IN THAT VOTING BOOTH ON TUESDAY 
NEXT— BE AN AMERICAN CITIZEN. 

WHATEVER YOUR CONSCIENCE DICTATES— DO THAT, AND THAT ONLY. 

BE HONEST WITH YOURSELF AND YOU WILL HAVE BEEN HONEST WITH 
YOUR FELLOW MEN. 



GEORGE WHARTON PEPPER, Republican 
Former U. S. Senator 

GEORGE W. NORRIS, Democrat 
Former Governor, Federal Reserve Bank, 
Philadelphia District 

MRS. LUCRETIA BLANKENBURG, Republican 

THOMAS W. PHILLIPS, Republican 
Former Member of Congress 

GEORGE MORGAN, President 

Gilberton Local, United Mine Workers of America 



E. LOWRY HUMES, Democrat 
Former U. S. District Attorney 

HARRY GIBSON, President 

Kehley Run Local, United Mine Workers of America 

JOHN A. McSPARRAN, Democrat 

Former Master, Pennsylvania Grange 

Former Secretary, Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture 

MRS. WM. H. BIESTER, JR., Republican 
Past National President, American Legion Auxiliary 

GEORGE T. SIMMONS, Republican 
Publisher, Progressive Labor World 



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October 30, 1936 



OUR TOWN 



Page Seven 



Directors Approve 
Sinf onietta Concerts 



Lower Morion's school directors 
gave their approval to the sinfonietta 
directed by Bruce C. Beach at their 
October session. The board stipulated 
that not less than twenty night re- 
hearsals be held in the Administration 
Building bandroom, Ardmore, with 
two public concerts to be given. 

Last month the total enrollment in 
the township's public schools was 
5344. 

School buildings will be used as fol- 
lows, Mr. Downs reported: 

Junior High School, November 16 
for lecture, Bala-Cynwyd Woman's 
Club; December 9, for lecture, Boy 
Scouts of Montgomery and Delaware 
Counties; Main Line Orchestra for 
concerts, December 10, February 10, 
March 31, May 10. 

Bryn Mawr School— Friday eve- 
ning* for basketball, Men's Brother- 
hood of the Lower Merion Baptist 
Church. 

Pcnn Wynne School— Wednesday 
evenings for basketball, Penn Wynne 
Basketball Club. 

A total of 446 children are enrolled 
in instrumental music classes in the 
elementary schools, Mr. Downs' re- 
port stated. 

On the recommendation of Superin- 
tendent Downs, Miss Marion E. Bailey 
was employed as an additional teacher 
in the Senior High because of the 
crowded conditions. 

She is a graduate of Bryn Mawr 
College, magna cum laude, and also 
has received her master's degree from 
that institution. She has had three 
years' teaching experience and, ac- 
cording to Mr. Downs, is exceptionally 
well qualified in Latin and English. 



EVEN IF 

YOU DID NOT 

REGISTER 

YOU 
CAN VOTE 

in any borough or township, 
without inconvenience or ex- 
pense. 

The only requirement is that 
you must have lived in Penn- 
sylvania at least one year (or 
six months, if you are a former 
Pcnnsylvanian), and within 
your present voting district for 
two months .prior to Election 
Day, and be sponsored by a reg- 
istered voter. 

Your affidavit affirming resi- 
dence will be taken at the poll- 
ing place. 




Give Badminton Exhibition 

The Rev. Robert E. Keighton, pas- 
tor, and three members of the Baptist 
Church of the Evangel put on an ex- 



hibition of badminton at Crozer Semi- 
nary, Chester, last Thursday. 

The team composed of Mr. Keigh- 
ton and Messrs. Ralph Giles, John 
Kent and Walter B. Taitt, came to 



Crozer Seminary at the invitation of 
Charles R. Leech, president of the 
Crozer student body and son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles S. Leech, of 102 
Dudley avenue, Narberth. 



Issues Instructions 
on Cash Relief Checks 



— Photo by Bachracli. 
MRS. GEORGE CAMPBELL LEWIS 
of Bryn Maivr, who is a member 
of the committee planning the 
program for State Federation of 
Women's Clubs to be held from 
May 11 to May H in Philadelphia, j 



Tku/ 1937 

C1EWOLE 1 



CoTlt Grniplete£i|T[£ur 



State Emergency Board Gives 

Warning to Recipients 

and Storekeepers 



Add Clarke Property 
to High School Plant 



Main Lines 



Continued from Pace One 
Contrasts: Mrs. Cummins Cather- 
wood, of Bryn Mawr, drove her auto- 
mobile into a tree to avoid striking a 
dog, and suffered a broken nose. She 
is the former Virginia Kent, daugh- 
ter of A. Atwater Kent, Ardmore. . . . 
Watching Miss Joan Adler, Consho- 
hocken State road, Cynwyd, instead 
of the road, Albert Frank, Philadel- 
phia, ran over and killed the Adler 
family's dog, paid i?17.25 line and 
costs before Magistrate Kromer at 
Ardmore. 

James Woolfolk, 15, Ardmore negro, 
according to Lower Merion police, has 
confessed to most of eleven larcenies 
in his community with which he is 
charged. . . . Dominic Nudy, Devon 
shoemaker, died despite two opera- 
tions at Bryn Mawr Hospital follow- 
ing a throat injury caused by choking 
on a piece of chicken. 

Nathan Sumner, alleged clerk at 
William Okum's delicatessen on City 
Line avenue, Bala-Cynwyd, was fined 
$100 and costs at Norristown, after 
admitting he sold beer in retail lots 
whereas Okum has only a wholesale 
license. Okum also faces a liquor 
law violation charge. 

II. I 1 '. Palmer has bought from R. 
D. MacGufiin the lG-room-residence 
and one-acre plot on Ballytore road, 
Wynnewood. . . . Health Officer Mar- 
vin E. Reynolds, Lower Merion, re- 
ported last week two more scarlet 
fever cases in Ardmore. 
* * * 

An attractive brunette passed 
"bouncing" checks totalling $75 on 
four Bryn Mawr chain stores this 
week. . . . Postmaster Emma L. Ea- 
lcins, of Wynnewood, this week pre- 
sented at Washington, D. C, a peti- 
tion hearing 1000 Wynnewood signa- 
tures asking house-to-house mail 
delivery. 

Temperatures under the freezing 
point were reported Tuesday in Glad- 
wync, Bala and Wayne. . . . Upper 
Darby, as part of its "Miracle of 
Progress" 150th anniversary, this 
week dedicated its new $500,000 69th 
Street Terminal building. 

Bullock-Sanderson Post, American 
Legion, Ardmore, has chosen the Rev. 
Eugene A. Kelly, rector of St. Col- 
nian's Church, as the recipient of the 
annual most-deserving citizen award 
of that community. Father Kelly is 



With the inception of cash relief 
throughout the State, it seems desir- 
able to call the attention of relief re- 
cipients, storekeepers and others to 
the necessity for observing certain 
precautions in handling the checks 
which soon will be issued in place of 
the various types of relief orders now 
in use. 

This is being done primarily with 
the idea in mind that a little care used 
in handling checks may avoid con- 
siderable trouble and expense, and 
possibly actual hardship to relief 
families. 

To the relief recipient the following 
are the most important items to be 
remembered. 

1. Don't let anyone else cash your 
check. It must be endorsed by the in- 
dividual to whom it is issued — not that 
individual's wife (or husband) or 
some other member of the household. 
The signature on the back of the check 
must be in ink, and must be exactly 
as the name is written on the face of 
the check. 

2. Be careful with your check. It 
is impossible to replace a lost or mis- 
laid check without considerable delay. 
This may mean hardship for your 
family, so be careful with it. Ar- 
range to be at home when your check 
is delivered, and cash it at once. 

To storekeepers or others who are 
asked to cash relief checks, the follow- 
ing points are emphasized : 

1. Be sure that you can identify 
the party who presents the check as 
the one to whom it is issued. Don't 
accept checks from people you don't 
know. 

2. Be sure that the check is properly 
endorsed, exactly as the name appears 
on the face of the check. Improp- 
erly endorsed checks will vol be hon- 
ored for payment in Harrisburg. 

It should be remembered by all who 
handle them that these checks arc sub- 
ject to Federal and State laws re- 
garding such instruments and that 
misuse of them will lead to prompt 
action by the authorities. 



Will Settle for £45,000, In- 

creasing Ardmore 

Holdings 

The Lower Merion Board of Edu- 
cation will in the near future make 
settlement of $45,000 for the prop- 
erty of James Clarke, situated along 
Wister road at the rear of the pres- 
ent high school plant. 

The Barker property, from which a 
three-story house was removed intact 
recently, has also been added to the 
high school's growing acreage. 

Indications are that a new Junior 
High School, contemplated for some 
time, will not be built in Cynwyd as 
once intended, but will instead be 
added to the high school group in 
Ardmore. 



Robert E. Haigh, son of Stanley E. 
Haigh, 319 N. Narberth avenue, Nar- 
berth, has been chosen as a member 
of the second tenor section of the 
Peddie Glee Club at Highstown, N. J. 

chaplain of the Merion Fire Company 
of Ardmore. 



Dated 

Deliveries 

Six trucks to serve 
you. No need to wait 
in all day. Just say 
when you %vant it. 



JEDDO- 

HIGHLAND 

COAL 




With an entirely new type of motor car body 
— now available for the first time on any low- 
priced car — combining new silence with new 
safety for your family. 



MAUSOLEUMS 



Edw. A. Carroll Co. 

Incorporated 
i 

CEMETERY 
MEMORIALS 

Telephone MANayunk 0166 

/ 

BALA-CYNWYD, PA. 

Belmont Avenue and 
Levering Mill Road 



MEMORIALS ERECTED 
IN ANY LOCALITY 




GLEANING 



HOTEL DENNIS 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Jhuxurlous lowing oif ike Sea 

An author might characterize , 
THE DENNIS as a hotel with ; 

a background— a rendezvous for j . | 

distinguished people who appre- 
ciate those finer details of service 
that lift a hostelry above the i 
commonplace. The luxurious 
lounging rooms and sundecks, 
the sumptuously furnished • 
rooms and appetizing cuisine, \ 
the health baths and diet kitchens '. ■«,,, 
—these together with a garden ^ " • 
terrace overlooking tliesea.mark ! X:,^ 
HOTEL DENNIS as distinc- !<•*> 'V 
tively different. A stay here truly 
is luxurious living by the sea. 
Kates will surprise and please 
you. Write for information. 

WALTI-R J. BUZ II Y, Inc. 

On the Ocean at Michigan Ave. 3 
Blocki from Station and Auditorium 



Well, you can't blame the little lady! 
She likes even home temperature— 
and who doesn't. But Friend Husband 
can't seem to get the knack. A wow at 
the office, he's a dud at providing heat. 

Our sympathy goes out to this Mr. 
and Mrs. They're just like many who 
fret their way through winter. And 
they really could enjoy home life to the 
full-at least as far as temperature is 
concerned— if they would just turn 
over a new leaf and have clean, all-effi- 
cient, controllable gas heat. Then, they 



could set the thermostat at the tem- 
perature wanted and let the auto- 
matic control keep it at this point. 

We'll install either Janitrol or Wels- 
bach Conversion Burnersimmediately 
on a small down payment. Price— $ 195 
cash for either, installed. Slightly 
higher on budget plan— 3 years to pay. 

IMPORTANT! 



Investigate our low combination gas rate. 
Also, let us explain fully our convenient 
budget plan permitting you to make equal 
monthly payments for gas consumed. 



Philadelphia Electric Company 

At Our Suburban Stores or See Your Plumber or Heating Contractor 



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^§H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Sfl^^-!^K5^!^^c5!55>^3t^M| 



Fage Eight 



OUR TOWN 



October 30, 1936 




Pottstown High School with a rec- 
ord of two victories against a single 
defeat for the current season will act 
as host to Al. Adam's eleven tomor- 
row. 

Lower Merion should make this 
game hor fourth consecutive victory, 
but unless I am seriously mistaken 
the Pottstown outfit will be a much 
harder team to crack than most peo- 
ple are believing. Pottstown teams 
play stubborn football, particularly 
on the home field, and unless Lower 
Merion starts to click in an impres- 
sive manner right from the start, 
fullback Connor is going to keep the 
ball in Lower Morion's territory all 
afternoon with his booming kicks. 
The up-county squad always boasts 
at least one good open field runner 
and this year is no exception. This 
game is undoubtedly a fine spot for 
an upset, and unless the local boys 
are on their toes both mentally and 
physically, there may be broken hearts 
along the Main Line Rialto tomorrow 
eve. 

* ;■: :!J 

The air is already charged with in- 
terest and anticipation over the 
game to be played with Norristown 
on Pennypaeker Field next week. 
Pete Lewis has another strong eleven 
this year and since a win over the 
Lower Morionitcs is the greatest 
thrill that a Norristown sports fol- 
lower or player can have, then we 
may expect a really groat game. 

The fracas over at Upper Darby 
last Saturday increases the curiosity 
of the general public concerning this 
latest Norristown aggregation, and 
no doubt the paying public will be 
on hand by the thousands to view 
them. They do say that young Mc- 
Crackcn is the greatest line cracker 
in the suburbs and elsewhere, and 
that the entire team plays a hard- 
driving game from start to finish. 

* * * 

The West Philadelphia game last 
week was interesting to the large 
crowd of spectators and proved that 
Lower Merion has a team that will 
give any high school in this area a 
real battle. 

Ted Jefferson remains the outstand- 
ing all around player on the squad. 
Captain George Powell is probably 
the outstanding lineman, doing his 
job not only on defense, but consist- 
ently opens up holes for his backs on 
offense. Clarence Whitfield stole the 
show last week against West Phila- 
delphia. He threw opposing backs 
for losses time after time. Ramsey, 
Miller and the above mentioned lads 
have been playing superb ball during 
the last few games. 

* * * 

Any writer who enters into the na- 
tional pastime of picking winners is 
inviting trouble. Although Penn 
rates the edge over Navy on past per- 
formance, yet who has the nerve to 
put their gilt on the line against the 
Middies after they have lost on two 
successive Saturdays, games that 
that they should have won? The 
Fordham-Pitt game offers a study to 
prognosticators. If Pitt gets the 
breaks and plays her usual game, 
there are few teams in the country 
to withstand her offensive drives, but 
then again, Fordham is a team that 
plays for one touchdown and then 
holds on with the teeth of a bulldog. 
Fordham is lucky, and a lucky guy 
is hard to down. 

Even Northwestern is in a good 
spot to take a tumble out of Minne- 
sota. The Gophers can be stopped. 
Washington and Nebraska came close 
to it. So why shouldn't the great 

team at Northwestern turn the trick? 

* * * 

Coach Dick Mattis leads his boys 
into one of the hardest games of the 
year today. Edison Junior High 
School comes to Pennypaeker Field 
for the annual football game between 
the two great Junior High Schools. 
Ed. Pollock of the Philadelphia Led- 
ger will be the guest speaker at the 
rally to be held in the auditorium 
this morning. 

Lower Merion leads by one game in 
the five-year series and if the teams 
play according to Hoyle, the distance 
will be increased to a two-game ad- 
vantage by sundown today. 



Play Well Presented 

Under Difficulties 



Continued from Face Uiib 
— but there were other times when 
the play seemed to falter to an ex- 
tent that has seldom if ever before 
been observed in the plays given by 
the club. Apparently this halting ef- 
fect was traceable to the fact that the 
central figure, tne Bishop, was suffer- 
ing rather frequently from lapsus 
memora — which is high-hat for for- 
getting his lines — with the conse- 
quence that the others engaged in 
dialogue with him were thrown off 
stride. Occasionally an over-confident 
actor makes the mistake of feeling 
that extemporizing can he substituted 
for the hard work of learning linos — 
but it doesn't often work out very 
well, especially for the rest of the 
cast. 

Aside from this one glaring fault, 
which contributed rather largely to 
the less favorable effects of the action 
as a whole, Maurice du Marais as the 
Bishop was all that anyone could de- 
sire. In action, appearance and voice 
he was a convincing representative 
of the churchman enjoying to the full 
an opportunity to give play to his 
secret desires for contact with worldly 
affairs. Du Marais possesses a fac- 
ulty for deft "business" which greatly 
enhances his natural ability. It is 
greatly to be regretted that the faulty 
memory previously discussed inter- 
fered with an otherwise splendid per- 
formance. 

William H. Muller, as Red Kagan, 
the barman, maintained the high place 
I he holds in the admiration of Nar- 
I berth audiences. Barring a tendency 
I to mix Irish brogue with Cockney ac- 
cent, Bill did his usual swell job and 
I captured and held the fancy of his 
I auditors throughout the play. 
I George Werner, playing Donald 
Meadows, the young society man en- 
deavoring by illegal and strong-arm 
methods to right a wrong done to the 
father of his sweetheart, deserves 
much commendation, although occa- 
sionally his transition from the 
"pseudo-gangster" to the care-free 
gentleman seemed somewhat too sud- 
den and complete, in view of what he 
had on his mind. His sweetheart and 
companion in crime, Hester Grantham 
i (played by Betty Bruneel, who has 
; blossomed from the Juvenile into beau- 
Itiful young womanhood and is ex- 
j tremely easy on the eyes) , displayed 
j the continuing apprehension and 
tenseness that the situation seemed to 
demand. Betty's work throughout 
was excellent. 

Playing the part of the not-too- 
scrupulous man of wealth and ham- 
boozler of Hester's father, Bob Estes 
gave a good presentation, as did also 
Ruth Conley as his wife — a woman 
elevated to the higher social levels 
j through her marriage, slipping occa- 
! sionally into errors of language that 
I betrayed her lowly origin, but finally 
(displaying principles of character far 
I above those of her husband. 
j Elmer Hackman as the conniv- 
jing "Collins," George McAllister as 
| "Frenchy" and Francis Mitchell as 
! the Bishop's secretary, all carried out 
their assignments well, although it is 
I difficult to conceive of a Bishop's sec- 
retary as quite so servile and meek a 
character as was portray jd. That is 
: perhaps a matter of opinion — but in 
jany event Mitchell's performance was 
| enjoyable. 

j Last, but certainly not least, was 
ithe delightful characterization of 
I' Lady Emily Lyons," the Bishop's 
! sister, given by Evelyn Dutten, who 
| is a newcomer to Narberth audiences. 
j Miss Dutton managed to secure a com- 
jbination of naivete, piquant curiosity, 
i audacious innocence and courageous 
righteousness that was quite captivat- 
ing and effective. Her portrayal de- 
' serves high commendation, 
i Back of the scenes Paul Goodyear's 
committee labored hard and success- 
j fully at the make-up work, their mas- 
! tcrpiece being the "shiner" bestowed 
I on the Bishop's secretary; while 
j Cecilia Link, as assistant director, 
| struggled with the prompting and 
! other duties that fall to an assistant. 
j To whom was she assistant? Why, 
| no other than Mrs. Martha Simpson, 
! who has been responsible for the suc- 
I cess of many of the prior efforts of 
1 The Narberth Players. No director 
j can give a guaranty against forgotten 
! lines — but in every other respect "The 
Bishop Misbehaves" showed evidence 
of the skilful handiwork that is Mrs. 
Simpson's. (By A. N. P.) 



Mickey Gavin Fund 

Total Likely #500 



Continued from Pane One 
Mickey Gavin Fuv.tl 

§16, Manoa Baseball Club. 

$10, Main Line Twilight League. 

$14, Anonymous and Friends. 

$5 each, Charles Jones, Marios Chi- 
os, Wilmer G. Crowell Family, Frank- 
lin Tobacco Co. 

$3 each, Charles Harnden, E. II. 
Davis. 



Church Notes 



Sermon: "In Christ at 



ble Hour 
Narberth." 

Tuesday evening — Community Bi- 
ble Class. 

Wednesday evening — Prayer meet- 



! ing. 8 o'clock. 



Narberth Methodist Episcopal 

Rev. W. Vernon Middleton, Minister 
Sunday, November 1: 

9.45 A. M.-Church School. j Mi , cs > Connor 

11.00 A. M. — Morning Worship.; So]emn Mass of Requiem will be 
Sermon: "The Christian and Citizen- ! sung at 10 A M this Friday at St. 
ship." j Margaret's Church, Narberth, for 

G.45 P. M. — Epworth Leagues. i Miles O'Connor after funeral services 

7.45 P. M. — Evening Worship! at his late residence, 859 Montgom- 
Fourth address in the series "What! cry avenue, Narberth, at 8.30 A. M. 
$2 each, Howard Levis, William . is There in Religion" — "Illumination." , Interment will be at St. Denis' Ccm- 
Levis, Harry Gray, I. S. Raspin, Rob- j Monday, November 2: Jetry, Oakmont. 

ert Compton, J. M. Casey, J. J. White-! 7.30-9.30 P. M.— Main Line Teach- j Mr O'Connor, who died Sunday, is 
side, Leo Powers, James Gallagher, ! ers' Training School in the Ardmore | sul . vjvc(1 Dy n j s w jf C| j\i rs . Helen M. 
M. E. and R. L. Russel, H. G. Mar- j M. E. Church. Dr. J. S. Ladd Thomas, ! O'Connor. 



M. E. Church in Gcr- 



tin, William E. Newborg, N. B. Mont- j of the First 

II. Pollock. imantown, will be the speaker at the i 



gomcry, E 

$1 each, Jack Cotter, George Mary- j 
ott, Perry Redifer, Henry Fryc, ! 
Charles Hewitt, Frank Dixon, Frank ; 
Purcell, C. B. Stoudt, Betty Baclner, 
John Gallagher, O. II., J. Hongler, 
Eloise Harnden, Nick Finoia, William 

A. Stoudt, Dave Stroup, Howard L. 
Loins, Ralph, E. T. Pike, E. C. Mc- 
Caulley, J. M. Baor, Arthur Cooke, 
C. Shmidheiser, C. H. Ewcll, Harry 

B. Wall, Henry E. Smith, S. II. Mc- 



II c was a member of the Holy Name 
Society. 



Forum Class. 

Tuesday, November 3: ; ...... .,., . , 

7.30 P.M.-Senior Epworth League I M:;i ' J cnn,c M ' K'lp«nck 

business meeting. j JIrs - J cllll 'e M. Kilpatrick, wife of 

Wednesday, November 4: j George B. Kilpatrick, former presi- 

3.30 P. M. — Junior Epworth ' « k,llt ° r U,< ' WL ' st Philadelphia Realty 
League. 

8.00 P. M— Mid-Week Service. 

Thursday, November 5 : 



Cartan, William Ferguson, C. II. Ca- j 
hin, F. R. Lindsey, Harvey Cooke, Jr., 
Daniel McGarry, Jr., A. Ilartzell, 
Myrtle Harnden, Max Breslow, A. 
Ward, W. II. Lawson, Eddie Ensinger, 
Joe Casey, R. C. Heath, W. J. Lough- 
lin, V. K. Simpson, Mrs. E. T. Pike, 
W. C. Bryant, Howard Smith, O. 
Berry, Charles Heckle. 

50c, Mrs. Clarence Humphrey. 

Undisclosed amount, E. P. Dold. 
R. A. CABREY. 



i Board, died October 22 at her home on 

| Owen road, Wynnewood, after a 

1 week's illness. She was 61, and is 

! 12.30-0.30 P. M.— Annual Ovster I also survived by a son, Lawrence G., 

! Supper at the Methodist Episcopal ' » 11 ' 1 two daughters, Ann J. and Kath- 

I Home for the Aged in Bala. Tickets, 

05 cents. 

8.00 P. M.— Choir rehearsal. 



L'rine Kilpatrick. 
It it's mimeographed, it isn't news. 



After Summer 

your hair, skin find nails need 
reconditioning. 

Winter activities demand that 
you look your best. 

Consult us — note.' 

SUZANNE JORET GILL 

216 Dudley Ave. Narberth 2324 



'IT'S REAL" 



OUR OWN 



R A C 

ARM 



K 

M 



SWEET 
CIDER! 

Made daily from 
clean washed Ap- 
ples of good 
quality 

APPLES 

Smoke House 

Delicious 

— o — 

PUMPKINS 

BILL'S 
ARRETS 



MALVERN — Lincoln Highway 

ARDMORE — Opposite Strawbridge & 

Clothier Store 



General Wayne Rally 

Social-Political 



Hit 



Coiuimicd from I'a^e tnio 
trusteeship of the taxpayers' money. 

Said Mr. Hess: "We have no quar- 
rel with the Democrats. Our fight is 
with the New Dealers who have set 
class against class." 

Keynote of the meeting was festiv- 
ity. 

John H. Link, General Wayne Re- 
publican Committeeman, presided -at j ciiolv i-elicarisa.1 
the meeting which was arranged by j Friday 7.00 P. 
a committee of local residents. j d ;lss . 

A. D. Blair was chairman of the | Friday 7.45 P 



Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 

Rev. Cietus A. Senft, Pastor 
Sunday, November 1, 1930: 
9. -15 A. M.— Bible School. 
11.00 A. .AL— The Fifth Annual 
Hi. me Cuming Service. Everything at 
i'.s best. The attendance must not 
be an exception. Theme: "Standing 
i\.r the Faith." 

0.-15 P. M.-- -Luther League Devo- 
tional meeting. 

I 7.15 p. M.— The Vesper Service, 
i Thome: "A Mother's Praver An- 
swered. 
j Monday, 7.30 P. M.— Boy Scouts. 

Tuesday, 12.30 P. M. — Missionary 
i Society af the home of Mrs. Rent- 
schler, 313 Price avenue. 
| Tuesday, 8.00 P. M.— Council meet- 
I ing at the home of Mr. Tripician, 332 
j Foiv. ; t avenue. 

Wednesday, 7.00 P. M. — • Junior 



M. — Confirmation 



M.— Choir rc- 



Baptist Church of the Evangel 

Robert E. Keighton, Minister 
Stanley T. Reiff, Organist 
Sunday, November 1 : 
9.45 A. M.— The Church School. 
Classes for adults taught by Mrs. 
Deer and the pastor. 

11.00 A. M.— The Morning Worship. 

Supper. 



rally. His committee included Mrs. ' hoarsal. 
W. Russell Green, District Republican 
Committeewoman; John H. Jefferies, 
Jr., General Wayne Commissioner; 
Mrs. John II. Link, chairman of re- 
freshment committee; W. Morgan 
Churchman, chairman of publicity; 
George C. T. Remington, Major Jos- 
eph E. Bailey, Owen B. Schmidt, Ja- 
cob Greiner and F. D. Moore. 

The invocation was given by the j observance of thc Lo rd's 
Rev. Gibson Bell, rector of All-Saints ■ Th ome— "ThanksgivinR." 
Church, Wynnewood. j 7 45 p M ._ Eveninff Worship. Ser- 

On the stage were Magistrate ; mf)n . „ The So ,. vice of Religion." 4— 
Franklin P. Kromer, Bala Commis- j «x ne other Side." 
sioner George W. Brown, Township j Monday, November 2: 
Treasurer Peter C. Hess, Lambert { 8 00 p ' M _ Meeting of the Board of 
Cadwalader, candidate for the Legis- ; Trustees, 
lature; Mr. Jefferies, Magistrate Wal- j Tuesday, November 3: 
ter B. Lownes, Jr., Dr. Frank P. K. | 10-30 a.'m.— The White Cross. 
Barker, Gladwyne Commissioner and j 1130 A . M.— Devotional Service. 
Magistrate C. Howard Meredith. | During the day— a sale of old books! 

5.30 to 7.30 P. M.— Roast tender- 
loin dinner. Served by the Men's Asso- 



Main Line Basketball 



League Plans Season ciation. 

Wednesday, November 4: 

Plans for the Main Line Basketball j 8-0" P- M.— Mid-week meeting of 
League season were made this week | the church. Theme— "A Study of 
at a meeting in the Arcadia Restau- | Worship." 
rant, Narberth. 

The "A" circuit will consist of Penn 
Wynne, Haverford Aces, Narberth, 
Phoenixville, Chester and two other 
teams to be chosen. Thc "B" League 
will include Wayne Raiders, St. Kath- r for men and women, 
arine's Catholic Club, Haverford Cel- \ 11.00 A. M. — The Morning Worship, 
tics, Autocar, Artisans, Phoenixville { Theme: "The Church." 
and Narberth. The B's will start No- 1 G.45 P. M.— The Three C. E. So- 
vember 23, the A's, November 27. j cieties. 



,1 



The Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Archer E. Anderson, Pastor 
Meetings for Sunday, November 1 : 
9.45 A. M— Bible School. Classes 



J. Herbert Good has been named 
publicity director. Harry Hollar, 
Narberth, was chosen vice-president 
with the power to appoint all officials 
in both circuits and with complete 
charge of the "B" League. 



.45 P. M— Narberth's Happy Bi- 



Band Wins Music Award 

The Lower Merion High School 
Band won first prize for musicianship 
and drilling in the contest for high 
school bands held last Saturday on 
Franklin Field in connection with the 
Penn-Brown football game. 



Gorodetzky at Bryn Mawr 

Jacob Gorodetzky, concert violinist, 
has been appointed a member of the 
faculty at the Bryn Mawr Conserva- 
tory of Music. Mr. Gorodetzky has 



Auxiliary Meets November 5 i 
The Women's Auxiliary of the Nar- 
berth Presbyterian Church will meet '. 
in the church parlors Thursday, No- 1 
vcmber 5, from 10 A. M. until 4 P.! 
M. Sewing and surgical dressings. ! 
Luncheon, 12.30. Mrs. E. II. Cockrill ■ 
is the hostess. j 
i 

recently returned from Paris, where 

he graduated with first honors from 

! the Conservatoire Nationale, and won | 

1 the Prix d'Honneur of the Concours 

I Bellan. | 



D. A. R. Chapter Nears Seven 
The Jeptha Abbott Chapter of the 
D. A. R. will celebrate its seventh 
birthday with a party at the home j 
of Mrs. A. Giraud Foote, Beech ter-i 
race, Merion, Monday, at two o'clock. ] 
The speaker will be Mrs. William H. 
Pouch, director of the Special Na- 
tional Committee for Junior Member- 
ship, organizing secretary general. 

Reports of the State Conference 
will be given and final arrangements 
made for the dance to be held Friday, 
November 20. The hostess will be 
Mrs. Buchanan Harrar, .Jr. 



Newton's Phone is 2550 

In the advertisement of the New- 
ton Coal Company last week, an in- 
correct telephone number appeared. 
This was due to an error in the man- 
ufacture of the plate from which the 
advertisement was printed. 

The correct number to call for 
quick coal service these chilly days 
is ARDMORE 2550. 




"Daddy's getting 
Newton Coal today" 

That means the home will be 
warm and cozy, with safe steady 
heat— and lower cost in the long 
run. Ask about our Budget Plan. 

Phono Ardmore 2550 or Allegheny 8400 



NEWTON COALJ 

ers the burning question iM 



©G.B.N.C.CO. 



Golden GllEKNfSESS 




HOME AGAIN? 

Brookmead offers Immediate 

Service to all parts of the Main 

. Producers a/* Line. lust telephone Wayne 1121. 

America's Tohlc MUk 

Children of the families voting for Brookmead by supporting its 
pioneer work of over 20 years arc keen to get back to 

TRADE MARK GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK 

I0 c 'c More Food Value — their strong young bodies demand thc 

Bone and Muscle Building Materials 

Protein, Milk Sugar and Buttcrfat 

Appetizing Flavor and Golden Color 

Brookmead Guernsey Dairies 

West Lancaster Avenue Wayne, Pa. 

Only Authorized Producer and Distributor 
under license of American Guernsey Cattle Club 




Hallowe'ens Party-Time... 

— and Whiteside's thc place to stock up. Note these week-end 
specials, and ask for our circular giving further details: 

Repp's natural sweet 

Apple CIDER ^-gal. jug, 25c; gal. 39c 

Fancy Mixed NUTS Lb. 25c 

Diamond Mayette WALNUTS lu. 25c 

Dromedary DATES 2 rugs. 



25c 



Ivins 



SPICED WAFERS u>. 19c; 3-lb. rk B . 55c 



— PENN TREATY BRAND: — 
Fancy BARTLETT PEARS Large 

Fancy ASPARAGUS No. 2 

Fancy center (choicest) slices — 

Sliced PINEAPPLE 2 Large 



Can 



Can 



Cans 



21c 
28c 

39c 



BISQUICK bride's size 17c; family size 29c 

Wilmar PEANUT BUTTER 16-oz. ,ar 15c 

Bosant Wonder Coffee lu. 19c 

Quaker Aristocrat Coffee ld. 23c 

CRISCO Ll>. Can 22c; 3 LU. Can 63c 



Land o'Lnkes sweet cream 

BUTTER i» 40c 

STRODE'S SAUSAGE 38c 

SCRAPPLE l„ 18c 

PIN BONE ROAST of BEEF .■> 35c 

RUMP of VEAL l... 25c 



Extra fancy medium size 

SUNKIST ORANGES »-». 25c 

f»r 14C 

14c 



Extra fancy GRAPEFRUIT 3 

Eating or Cooking APPLES 3 



LI) 



J. J. WHITESIDE 

Fish, Oysters, Fruits, Vegetables, Groceries, Prime Meats 

237 Haverford Avenue 

Narberth 3668 Free Delivery